Bill allows Nevada colleges to study industrial hemp

Nevada lawmakers have approved a measure that would allow colleges or the state agriculture department to grow industrial hemp.

Assembly members voted unanimously on Friday to approve SB305. The measure already passed the Senate and now heads to Gov. Brian Sandoval for approval.

Democratic Sen. Tick Segerblom is sponsoring the measure, which would allow governmental bodies to cultivate industrial hemp for agricultural or research purposes.

The bill was amended to remove language allowing private growers to cultivate hemp, and to clarify that the product can’t be used as a drug. The state agriculture department cautioned in a fiscal note that Nevada’s climate isn’t ideal for growing hemp.

Industrial hemp differs from medical or recreational marijuana plants in THC content and appearance. Industrial cannabis products include things like hemp yarn.

Lawmaker proposes measure to raise minimum wage to $15 in Nevada

A Nevada senator is proposing a constitutional amendment to nearly double the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Democratic Sen. Tick Segerblom is sponsoring SJR 8, which was heard Wednesday in the Senate Legislative Operations and Elections. The proposed amendment would raise the minimum wage to $15 or $16 an hour depending if the employer offers health insurance.

Segerblom and a number of progressive groups said the change is necessary because the current minimum wage isn’t livable. A number of business lobbyists testified against the proposal and said it would increase consumer prices and cost companies jobs.

Republican Sen. Joe Hardy is sponsoring another constitutional amendment heard on Monday repealing the state’s minimum wage and requiring the Legislature to set a basic wage based on the Consumer Price Index.

In case you haven’t heard, taxes are going to be big once the 2015 Legislature convenes on Monday.

In case you haven’t heard, taxes are going to be big once the 2015 Legislature convenes on Monday.

Gov. Brian Sandoval has called for increase in the business license fee (which carries the delicious acronym “BLT”), switching to a progressive fee depending on a company’s gross receipts. He’s also proposed continuing a package of temporary taxes.

But there are plenty of other things the Legislature will have to deal with in its compressed, four-month session as it sets policy for the state for the coming two years. Here’s a look at five of those pressing issues, and maybe a few more:

1. Construction defect reform: For years, Republicans have sought to overhaul the rules regarding when and how homeowners can sue construction companies or home-repair contractors for allegedly shoddy work. But Democrats successfully kept most of those bills at bay. Now that Republicans control both houses of the Legislature, things will be different.

For one, Assemblyman Ira Hansen, R-Sparks, is chairman of the Assembly Judiciary Committee (where construction defect bills will be heard). Hansen is a plumbing contractor, and has long been an advocate of a “right to repair” bill in which contractors get a chance to make a defective repair right before being sued.

For another, state Sen. Greg Brower, R-Reno, is preparing a comprehensive tort reform package for introduction in the Senate Judiciary Committee, which he chairs. Senate Majority Leader Michael Roberson, R-Henderson, said a recent breakfast forum sponsored by the Review-Journal and the Las Vegas Metro Chamber of Commerce that Nevada’s litigious legal environment is “a hidden tax on business.” So the question is not whether the law will be reformed, but how. And how will Democrats — who count trial lawyers among their key constituencies — react to the proposals, now that Republicans have the votes to pass them even in the face of Democratic opposition.

2. Organized labor reform:Danny Thompson, the head of Nevada’s AFL-CIO, just today announced that working families are under attack by Republican lawmakers. And organized labor reforms long sought by the GOP are what he meant. Now that Republicans are in charge, this will be a prime focus. Ideas include changes to binding arbitration rules (or perhaps the elimination of it entirely), changes to the Public Employees Retirement System pension system and clearly defining a “fiscal emergency,” as well as outlining how collective bargaining contracts are to be handled in such circumstances, are going to be the subject of legislation in the 2015 session.

Once again, Democrats will find themselves playing defense, as labor unions are among the most reliable of their political base. But with a sympathetic Republican governor, they may not be able to muster the votes to stop some of the more moderate ideas. The real question: What will moderate Republicans and Sandoval do if, for example, a bill to simply end government-worker collective bargaining makes it out of the legislative building?

3. Education reform: Public schools in Nevada don’t have a very good reputation, but the prescriptions to fix them are as varied as the membership in the Legislature. Sandoval set the tone early in his State of the State address,promising to add more than $780 million to K-12 schools alone. But the Republican governor also called for reforms, and that’s where some of the biggest political battles will take place.

School choice will be an oft-debated topic during the session, including vouchers, scholarships and an expansion of the laws governing charter schools. While the state’s constitution prohibits state funds from being used for sectarian education, some conservatives believe that provision can be evaded by giving money directly to parents and allowing them to choose a private, even a parochial school, without offending the constitution.

Not only that, but reforms to rules governing teachers may be in the works, including further restricting (or even eliminating) teacher tenure. Those efforts will be staunchly opposed by Democrats, one of whom once declared teachers to be the “backbone” of the party, without whose support it would be “defunct.”

4. Voter ID: Republicans have repeatedly tried to get a simple law passed in Nevada that would require a drivers license or state identification card in order to vote, but they’ve been just as repeatedly thwarted by Democrats. In fact, the Democratic antipathy to the idea even led lawmakers in the 2013 session to reject a proposal by then-Secretary of State Ross Miller that would have used DMV photos at polling places, but would not have disenfranchised any voter who didn’t have a photo ID. Their stated reason: Too costly.

But now, with Republicans in control of the Legislature and with the foremost advocate of voter ID, former state Sen. Barbara Cegavske, in the secretary of state’s office, voter ID is at the forefront of the agenda. But instead of Miller’s proposal — the only voter ID at the time that didn’t draw the condemnation ofBrennan Center for Justice at New York University Law School — it appears Republicans will try to enact a straight-up voter ID requirement over Democratic objections and, inevitably, a lawsuit.

5. Marijuana: Once a neglected topic in Carson City (who else misses Assemblywoman-turned-Clark County Commissioner Chris Giunchigliani?!), marijuana is now the cause of the moment. Not only will the Legislature have to address problems that have cropped up with the licensing of medical marijuana dispensaries, but lawmakers will also be compelled to deal with a voter-approved initiative to legalize recreational marijuana outright. (If they approve the measure in the first 40 days, it could become law right away; if not, it goes to the 2016 ballot for voters to decide.)

Although he’s now in the minority, nobody knows more about the issue than state Sen. Tick Segerblom, D-Las Vegas, who will no doubt play a prominent role on the issue (when he’s not crossing swords with Republicans over labor and tort reforms).

6. And lots of other stuff: With more than 1,000 bills expected to be introduced (to say nothing of resolutions!), every subject under the desert sun will get some attention. Among the other issues are guns, especially where they may be carried concealed and whether a background check should be required for sales between two private parties. Economic development, including rules about which companies should get state incentives and how much they should pay their employees before they can get tax breaks from the state, is another one. The development of a UNLV medical school is another hot topic, one that Northern Nevada lawmakers will monitor with interest (since the only existing medical school in Nevada now is based at the University of Nevada Reno). And funding for treatment of mental health services will be an issue, spurred by negative publicity over the state’s handling of some patients who were bused to other states instead of receiving care here.

Oh, and my personal favorite: Wineries! Las Vegas may have a platoon of master sommeliers working at the various high-end restaurants in town, but there are precious few places where grapes are cultivated, fermented and bottled, to say nothing of handed out to the public in on-premises samples! Don’t make Las Vegans and Renoites schlep all the way to Napa Valley, Legislature!

Nevada Department of Alternative Sentencing did not have legal jurisdiction over Pre-Trial Defendants prior to July 2013 If you were under DAS supervision, you may have legal recourse to sue

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WTF NevadaAttention – Were you ever incarcerated in the Carson City jail? Was your food poisoned? Mine was and I posed a story that has gone viral with other people also claiming their food and water was tainted.  This happened to people in the ‘Hole’ and solitary confinement. This story is one of the biggest Facebook stories we’ve written with 420 Facebook like and referrals.

https://nevadastatepersonnelwatch.wordpress.com/2012/10/12/carson-city-jail-putting-methadone-in-the-waterfood/

ATTENTION Carson City, Douglas, Reno, Henderson, Nevada Department of Alternative Sentencing (“DAS”) did not have legal jurisdiction over Pre-Trial Defendants prior to July 2013 If you were under DAS supervision, you may have legal recourse to sue in federal court under Title 42, Section 1983 and have any related criminal charges, pleas and convictions vacated.

Nevada Department of Alternative Sentencing SB101 hearing. Carson City DAS did not have legal jurisdiction of pre trial defendants.

People have constitutional right we can’t stomp on either the US Constitution or the Nevada Constitution and I oppose the end result what this bill is going to allow them to do which they’re already doing without authority.

Bail has to be reasonable it can’t be coercive.

They can search their home they can search there be a call they have not been convicted they are charged with the crime whether it be a misdemeanor a gross misdemeanor or felony they still have their constitutional rights so my concern is that we’re taking these rights away from people. Continue reading

Letters to the Editor of RGJ and NV Appeal – Why Nevada needs to clean up the corruption, not a new appellate court

The Las Vegas Sun ran a story about the Nevada Supreme Court and the need for an appeals court. Our position is the Nevada should clean up the lower courts first since Nevada ranks near the bottom of the list for corruptibility. See Mike Weston’s Letter to the Editor of the Reno and Carson City newspapers.

RGJ Opnion

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opinion shopLetters to the Editor:

Clean up the lower courts and the corruption. Nevada received a D- grade on the Center for Public Integrity study in 2012 indicating rampant corruption. Nevada was one of the worst State in the Union. Time after time we hear the horror stories of judges running amuck and acting above the law by acting under the color of law to carry out vendettas and help the good ol boy network.

The road kill includes the likes of Las Vegas Judge Kathy Kathy Halverson, Reno Judge Jerry Carr Whitehead, Douglas Co Judge Jim EnEarl. New controversy is happening in Reno and Carson City with Judges Scott Pearson and John Tatro where the law is completely ignored and justice is obstructed in the cases of Reno resident Mike Weston and ANTI-Corruption activist Ty Robben from So. Tahoe, and formally Carson City, NV.

We’re getting attention, and we have the “Worlds Largest CRIME SCENE tape” and 4 foot tall by 150 long bright yellow banner and other massive signs like “John Tatro End the RAMPANT Corruption” and “Masto Backdates” and “Treason is a Capital crime”.

Both of us have been “demanding justice” using the legal system, however the system is broken. Judge Pearson is ignoring the DA Dick Gammick’s willingness to vacate and expunge a trumped up charge from over 8 years ago and now admits NHP edited the audio video dash cam footage!

Ty Robben has filed criminal, civil and judicial ethics complaints in his cases involving Judge Tatro.

Las Vegas Sun Brian Sandoval Security beefed up

Why Nevada needs a new appellate court

Sens. Tick Segerblom and Mark Hutchison

Friday, March 22, 2013 | 2:02 a.m.

Article 6 of the Nevada Constitution currently provides for one appellate court — the Supreme Court. Every single appeal from decisions rendered by Nevada’s 82 District Courts must be reviewed by the Supreme Court. This two-tier court structure has resulted in a staggering caseload for the Nevada Supreme Court, and the delay of justice — sometimes by years — for Nevada citizens. Continue reading

Nevadagate by Guy Felton – Ombudsman for Nevada

Nevadagate a youtube series exposing Nevada government corruption  by GuyFelton – Ombudsman for Nevada.  These youtube videos dig into an array of Nevada government corruption, conspiracies and cover-ups. Guy Felton has helped the Nevada ANTI-Corruption movement in his protesting efforts and his unique abilities to convey corruption in our youtube videos and his new series called Nevadagate. Please see Guy’s work below and visit his website Booksampler.net

Guy Felton is WAS running for U. S. Congress in 2011. Hooray! In this video, Guy discusses the controversy and conspiracy  surrounding the former University of Nevada Reno (“UNR”) President Milton Glick who allegedly died of stroke at 73 – but was it really a suicide or murder?

Uploaded on May 28, 2011

Guy’s background includes: Marine Corps Reservist, Intelligence Operative, Police Officer, Classroom Teacher, Head of Negotiations for Nevada State Education Association (now having 27,000 members), Newspaper Columnist, Newspaper Photographer, Executive Jobsearch Consultant (Listed in “Who’s Who in America”), Volunteer Ombudsman for the People of Nevada (the latter resulting in being wrongfully arrested and jailed three times for legally challenging corrupt public officials in Washoe County including Commissioners Humke, Weber, and Larkin ~ as well as Washoe Manager Katy Simon, and Deputy D.A. Melanie Foster.)

Guy Felton’s youtube “Nevadagate” series on Nevada Corruption

NEVADAGATE: SUGGESTIONS FOR THE 2013 LEGISLATURE

Nevada government is permeated with a culture of corruption. Members of the state legislature meet for only 4 months every other year. This does not permit anything close to proper administration of the public affairs of Nevada’s 2.7-million residents.  Members of the upcoming 2013 legislative session are asked to answer tough-but-fair questions which might force changes for the better.
Part 2 of at least 3 intended parts
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Published on Nov 7, 2012 by 

Part 1 of at least 3 parts.
Questions are raised on this video regarding Nevada government’s dismal report card grades issued by the State Integrity Investigation, and about Nevada’s Hell-hole prisons Continue reading