Who’s A-list and who’s a longshot in the race to replace Harry Reid

After U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., announced he will not run for a sixth term, political prognosticators declared the post a “toss-up,” with either party able to win the seat in 2016.

Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval immediately was declared the favorite to win, though the popular leader has said he isn’t interested.

On the Democratic side, Reid played the queenmaker, endorsing former Nevada Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto to succeed him. Just days following his March 27 retirement announcement, Reid was in Las Vegas, plotting her path to victory, saying he would put his formidable machine behind her.

“We are going to do everything we can,” Reid told the New York Times over a bowl of chicken soup, settling into his new role of political Godfather. “I have to make sure I take care of the person running for Senate in Nevada.”

Several potential contenders already have taken themselves out of the running, from Reid’s eldest son, Rory, to former U.S. Rep. Shelley Berkley, D-Nev., who now runs Tuoro University in Nevada and California.harry reid

U.S. Rep. Joe Heck, R-Nev., said he would rather stay in the House, where he has served since 2011. But like Sandoval, the congressman likely will feel pressure from GOP leaders who want their best candidate in 2016’s hottest race after the presidency.

Meanwhile, Clark County Commission Chairman Steve Sisolak, a Democrat, said he’s preparing for re-election and “leaning no” on a Senate run. U.S. Rep. Mark Amodei, R-Nev., has said in the past that he’s not interested, although Reid’s retirement could change that. State Treasurer Dan Schwartz, a Republican, said he would consider running only if Sandoval and Heck do not.

Yet the list of Nevadans who could try to join Washington’s exclusive club of 100 remains fairly long. Reid’s retirement has shifted the electoral ground, prompting relative newcomers and political veterans alike to consider the possibilities. Here’s a report card on some of the potential contenders:

Go to DAVIDLORY.US. Nevada Senator 2016 David Lory VanDerBeek
Nevadagovernor2014.com has been an amazing website and I’m grateful for all of the good that it has done and continues to do in the cause of freedom and the American dream. I’ll continue to maintain this website for the purposes of preserving the content for historical reference. However, the Internet website that will be my home for the remainder of my life as a political figure will be www.davidlory.us. That is where I will be online. I invite you to go there and join me as I continue to campaign for the freedom of Nevada and America. My next campaign is US Senate 2016. God bless and thank you for all of your amazing support for nevadagovernor2014.com.

DEMOCRATS:

CATHERINE CORTEZ MASTO

Money — A+: Cortez Masto should have no trouble filling Senate campaign coffers in a race that could exceed 2010’s highly competitive race in which both Reid and Republican Sharron Angle each raised and spent more than $25 million. Outside groups just about matched the candidates’ spending.

;) New mini NAG MASTO signs to placed all around the protest zone(s)

😉 New mini NAG MASTO signs to placed all around the protest zone(s)

On her own, Cortez Masto took in nearly $2.5 million for her elections in 2006 and 2010 and will have Reid as a rain­maker in 2016.

Since 2009, Reid has raised $23.6 million for his campaign committee, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Reid also helped land $46.7 million for the 2012 midterm elections for the Senate Democrats’ super PAC, Senate Majority PAC. Reid’s own campaign committee held $1.5 million as of Sept. 30.

Experience — B: Cortez Masto served eight years as attorney general after a career as a criminal prosecutor for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Washington, D.C., that gave her a taste of Capitol Hill.

Name Recognition — B: She’s held a high-profile statewide office for two terms and is a native Nevadan of Hispanic heritage. Her father, the late Manny Cortez, had a high profile in Southern Nevada as the longtime head of the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority and was partly responsible for making the Strip a tourist mecca.

Liability/Asset — C: Cortez Masto hasn’t had a tough campaign and might not be ready for a rough-and-tumble Senate race. She declined to challenge Sandoval last year.

DINA TITUS

Money — B: Titus has never had trouble raising money. She raised about $1.1 million last year for a 1st Congressional District race that wasn’t very competitive. She raised nearly $2.6 million for the highly competitive 2010 campaign in the 3rd Congressional District, which she lost to Heck. For a Senate run she could expect a lot of support from outside groups such as Emily’s List.

Experience — B: Titus has survived the campaign crucible and runs strong. Even her losses in some of the state’s most competitive districts were close. In 2010 she lost to Heck by just 1,748 votes.

Name Recognition — B: Titus has been around Nevada politics for decades, including 20 years in the state Senate (1988-2008) where she rose to become minority leader. She also has a statewide profile, having run for governor and losing to Republican Jim Gibbons in 2006.

Liability/Asset — B: Titus, a native Georgian, has a thick Southern accent that can dissuade voters who favor native Nevadans. Strongly independent, she isn’t afraid to cross Reid and wouldn’t hesitate to challenge Cortez Masto if she thinks she can win. Titus in 2012 ran for the 1st Congressional District after Reid hand-picked state Sen. Ruben Kihuen, D-Las Vegas, for the open seat. Kihuen dropped out before the primary.

ROSS MILLER

Money — A+: Miller is a talented fundraiser who brought in $2.6 million for his failed 2014 attorney general campaign.

Experience — C: At age 30, Miller became the youngest Nevada secretary of state in 2006 and was re-elected in 2010. But he faced weak GOP challengers in both campaigns. In 2014, he lost his first truly competitive race to Adam Laxalt, a political newcomer who eked out a slim 4,750-vote victory, or 46.2 percent to 45.3 percent. Miller suffered in the low turnout race as Democrats stayed home, but his campaign also failed to turn voters against Laxalt.

Name Recognition — A: Miller held statewide office for eight years and boasts the highest social media profile among Nevada officials with nearly 17,500 Twitter followers. In addition, his father is Bob Miller, who was governor from 1989 to 1999.

Liability/Asset — C: Miller’s love of socializing proved his downfall against Laxalt. He reported accepting more than $70,000 in gifts while secretary of state, including tickets to sporting events such as the Ultimate Fighting Championship and football games where he sat in luxury skyboxes. Miller said some of the freebies were educational conferences. His opponents were able to exploit the gifts and question his ethics.

LUCY FLORES

Money — C: Flores raised nearly $754,000 in her failed 2014 race for lieutenant governor — not nearly enough to keep up with Republican Mark Hutchison, who raised about $2.5 million to win.

Experience — C: Flores served two terms in the Assembly, but neither of those elections featured tough competition. In 2010 she took 82.16 percent of the vote in the general election. She swept up 73 percent of the vote in a three-way primary in 2012 but faced no general election opponent at all.

Name Recognition — C:Little known outside of Clark County, her weak showing last year was her first statewide campaign. It focused on her bio — former gang member and high-school dropout who had an abortion as a teen, then went on to graduate from law school and enter politics. Inspiring to many, her hard-luck tale might not play well in conservative rural Nevada.

Liability/Asset — C: Hispanics comprise nearly 30 percent of Nevada’s population and Flores had the Latino vote last year, but she had trouble reaching other demographic groups statewide. She’s considered a long shot for a Senate bid but a better candidate for the 4th Congressional District.

KATE MARSHALL

Money — C: Her secretary of state campaign raised $715,245 last year but spent $100,000 more.

Experience — D: Marshall won two terms as state treasurer but failed in a 2011 special election for the 2nd Congressional District and lost the secretary of state job last year.

Name Recognition — C: Few Nevadans can name the state treasurer, even one who served two terms.

Liability/Asset — C: Her high-pitched voice can be grating; she’s a two-time loser in her most recent elections.

REPUBLICANS:

BOB BEERS

Money — B: He raised $152,000 in 2013 for his Las Vegas City Council campaign and has shown he can get bigger bucks when needed, including more than $500,000 for one past state Senate bid.

Experience — B: Beers served in the Nevada Assembly and Senate from 1999 to 2008 but was washed away by the Democratic wave that swept Barack Obama into the White House. He rebounded in 2012, beating eight other contenders in a Las Vegas City Council special election with 37 percent of the vote. The following year voters gave him a landslide re-election, with 76 percent of the vote.

Name Recognition — C: He ran in the 2006 GOP gubernatorial primary but isn’t widely known outside Clark County.

Liability/Asset — B: Beers is the first candidate to announce he’s running for Reid’s seat, putting out the word and 55,000 pamphlets in January 2014. An accountant, he’s known for asking lots of questions before spending taxpayer money and was a leader of the Assembly’s “mean 15” which blocked a proposed $1 billion tax hike in 2003.

BRIAN SANDOVAL

Money — A+: Running virtually un­opposed, Sandoval raised about $3.7 million for his 2014 re-election, plus $1.4 million for his New Nevada PAC helping other GOP candidates. He raised more than $5 million to easily defeat Rory Reid in 2010.

Experience — B: The governor has served in all three branches of government as a member of the Nevada Assembly, state attorney general and as a federal judge. He’s never faced a tough campaign.

Name Recognition —A: Not only is Sandoval widely known, he’s also popular. More than 60 percent of Nevadans say he does a good job. No credible Democrat would run against him last year, and his re-election was a 71-percent landslide. He’s also gaining popularity among Nevada Latinos, who lean Democrat. Latino Decisions said exit polls showed Sandoval got 47 percent of the Hispanic vote in 2014, up from 15 percent in 2010.

Liability/Asset — Incomplete: Sandoval insists he doesn’t want to run for the Senate but instead is focused on finishing his second four-year term, which runs through 2018. How Sandoval comes out of the Nevada Legislature could affect his political future: Will lawmakers approve his $7.3 billion spending plan that includes $1.1 billion in new and extended taxes to fund education? Is he as “unbeatable” as some insiders say? Stay tuned.

JOE HECK

Money —A: Heck raised nearly $2.5 million for his 2014 campaign and spent less than $2 million. He would have no trouble raising big bucks for a Senate race from gaming interests and other major Nevada industries.

Experience — B: Heck has been able to hang on to his seat in the 3rd Congressional District for several elections, although it’s the state’s most competitive House district with an even Republican-Democrat split and independents leaning GOP. He’s also had a taste of defeat: In 2008 he lost his state Senate seat in a Democratic wave election that put President Barack Obama in office.

Name Recognition — C: Heck maintains a fairly low profile as a serious, workaday congressman, and he has never run a statewide race. That could put him at a disadvantage against someone with statewide campaign experience.

Liability/Asset — B: Heck’s promotion last year to brigadier general in the U.S. Army Reserve and past active duty as a doctor in Iraq make him an appealing candidate, particularly among Nevada’s large veteran population. But the moderate has come under fire from the left for voting with the conservative House caucus on hot-button issues such as immigration and equal pay. Heck said he’s staying put in the House, but 2016 could be his best chance to move up to the U.S. Senate.

BRIAN KROLICKI

Money — B: Krolicki hasn’t had a big-money race, although he raised $640,000 and spent $1.1 million in his first election for lieutenant governor in 2006. He raised about half that for his 2010 re-election.

Experience — B: He’s been around state government and GOP politics for a long time, serving two terms as state treasurer followed by two terms as lieutenant governor. He contemplated a run against Reid in 2010 but was sidelined by an ethics investigation that ultimately foundered.

Name Recognition — C: Krolicki has been on the statewide ballot four times, but remains relatively unknown.

Liability/Asset — D: His career took a hit with his 2008 indictment related to management of a college savings program while state treasurer. A judge later dismissed the felony charges, which Krolicki characterized as a partisan attack by then-Attorney General Cortez Masto.

MARK HUTCHISON

Money — A: Hutchison showed he can raise money — lots of it — even for the low-profile post of lieutenant governor. He raised at least $2.5 million to win a part-time job that puts him in line to replace Sandoval, if need be.

Experience — B: A newcomer to politics, Hutchison resigned his state Senate seat midterm to run for lieutenant governor as Sandoval’s choice. The stakes were high, but Hutchison sailed into office with 59.5 percent of the vote.

Name Recognition — C: Hutchison’s campaign attracted a lot of attention and he crisscrossed the state several times, yet he remains relatively unknown.

Liability/Asset — B: Sandoval’s support is a big plus. An attorney, Hutchison represented Nevada for free in its challenge to Obamacare — work that made him popular among conservatives but could hurt him among Democrats.

MICHAEL ROBERSON

Money — B: Roberson raised more than $600,000 last year toward his 2014 state Senate race, plus money for a PAC and other candidates, helping the GOP take control of the upper house.

Experience — C: His political career has taken off like a rocket since his first election to the state Senate in 2010. But the Senate majority leader never has been tested in a statewide race.

Name Recognition — C: His state Senate leadership gets his name out there, but his lack of a statewide run means he’s not that widely known. On the plus side, his base is Clark County, home to 75 percent of all Nevadans.

Liability/Asset — B: Roberson first ran as a strict conservative but has become a moderate over time. He’s now pushing for Sandoval’s $7.3 billion general fund budget and $1.1 billion package of new and extended taxes. This could hurt him in any GOP primary but help him during a general election. Insiders say family considerations and a desire to stay in the Legislature weigh against a U.S. Senate race, for now.

ADAM LAXALT

Money — A: Laxalt surprised many observers by raising more than $1.8 million in his first political campaign to score an upset over better-financed Ross Miller in last year’s attorney general race. He tapped conservatives in Washington, D.C., where his mother, Michelle Laxalt, was a widely known lobbyist. Acquaintances of his grandfather, former Nevada Gov. and U.S. Sen. Paul Laxalt, also ponied up.

Experience — C: Laxalt was a Navy judge advocate general and a lawyer in a private practice in Las Vegas. But he has only lived in Nevada for a few years and has run just one campaign. He would be sorely tested in a high-stakes contest that could decide which party controls the U.S. Senate.

Name Recognition — B: Laxalt’s family name helped him win support statewide. He also spent a lot of time traveling the dusty roads to reach every corner of Nevada last year.

Liability/Asset — C: During the campaign, an operative leaked a memo from a Laxalt job review at the private firm, Lewis Roca, where he worked. It said he had sloppy legal skills and was “a train wreck” as a lawyer. His campaign countered by releasing rave reviews he got in the military, including when he oversaw terrorism cases in Baghdad. Laxalt has suggested he wants to focus on his new job but hasn’t ruled out a Senate bid.

Contact Laura Myers at lmyers@reviewjournal.com or 702-387-2919. Find her on Twitter: @lmyerslvrj.

Former SOS Ross Miller lands job with Fine Entertainment

Ross Miller kicks ass

Former Secretary of State Ross Miller has been hired as vice president for business development and general counsel at Fine entertainment in Las Vegas.

Former Secretary of State Ross Miller has been hired as vice president for business development and general counsel at Fine entertainment in Las Vegas.

He said the position will allow him to use both his business and legal background. Miller is a lawyer who also holds an MBA.

Fine Entertainment founded by Jonathan Fine owns several restaurants and bars in Southern Nevada as well as Sting Surveillance, a security company.

KRNV: Attorney General’s race starts negative and will end negative

Reno, Nev. (MyNews4.com & KRNV)– The ads are vicious. One from Republican Adam Laxalt said, “A watchdog even found Nevada was vulnerable to corruption under Miller.” Another ad from Democrat Ross Miller said, “Adam Laxalt’s own firm called him a ‘train wreck’ saying he lacks basic legal skills.”

See video here: http://www.mynews4.com/news/local/story/Negative-to-the-last-drop/N7Kxj1oE2U285EewxGLIuA.cspx

If you listen to the ads, Laxalt is accused of being professionally unfit while Miller is being blasted for accepting tens of thousands in gifts. Political experts note this campaign started off negative from the very beginning. Truckee Meadows Community College Dean and political science professor Fred Lokken said, “It started on the Republican side in this race, not directly from the Laxalt campaign, but clearly from dollars most likely outside the state of Nevada.”

Miller is quick to point out the attacks started even before Laxalt was a declared candidate. He said, “They started attacking me 16 months ago, these out of state groups, you know. I don’t think I anticipated this long of an attack campaign lasting sixteen months.”

But Miller admits his side too has gone negative.It’s a fact that has not gone unnoticed by Laxalt. Laxalt said, “To be honest, before I got in this race, I was warned that the Miller machine would stop at nothing to win this race.”

Lokken notes the position of Attorney General is powerful one that is politically strategic for either party looking to groom a candidate for higher office. Lokken said, “It is probably seen as the most high of the constitutional offices, which really makes it the prize.It is staging for a stronger career and it gives an appearance of an heir apparancy, that sort of thing.” Miller agrees with that assessment adding, “I can’t speculate why those out-of-state groups have come in to try and attack me but its been made clear by even Dick Cheney who said several months ago, this is the most important state race in the country.”

Both Miller and Laxalt come from politically powerful families in Nevada. Miller is the son of former Governor Bob Miller. Laxalt is the grandson of former Senator Paul Laxalt. Miller said, “I come from a political family and so the negative stuff is part of the territory. I know how it works.” Laxalt, on the other hand, characterizes himself as a political newcomer. Lokken believes it is these family connections, providing voters with familiar names, that have allowed both candidates to receive contributions outside of the state. He said this race took on a very different tone once two known names entered the fray adding, “The cake walk was literally supposed to be for Ross Miller. The dramatic change was the introduction of someone who had name power that literally had that identification voters will remember.”

Lokken notes while you may not like negative campaigns, they’re not going away. He said, “They do it because it works and they will continue to do it until it doesn’t work. The voters have all the power in this. Unless they punish candidates that choose to engage in negative campaigning, the politicians will continue to do it.”

On Wednesday October 15, 2014 the Nevada ANTI CORRUPTION CRIME SCENE tape made its way to a Ross Miller for Nevada AG fundraiser in Reno, NV.

Crime

On Wednesday October 15, 2014 the Nevada ANTI CORRUPTION CRIME SCENE tape made its way to a Ross Miller for Nevada AG fundraiser in Reno, NV.

IMG_3697On Wednesday October 15, 2014 the Nevada ANTI CORRUPTION CRIME SCENE tape made its way to a Ross Miller for Nevada AG fundraiser in Reno, NV.

Tonja Brown wanted to remind Ross Miller about her ongoing issues. Adam Laxalt is not immune from the protest and both these potential AG candidates must deal with the years old issue.

See More here: Tonja Brown Stories

Then just today we see this:

Wow, Laxalt family members endorse and not – that’s gotta hurt

Wow, Laxalt family members endorse and not – that’s gotta hurt

Doing what’s best for Nevada

Thu, Oct 16, 2014 (2:02 a.m.)

Ross Miller Nevada is corrupt

Ross Miller Nevada is corrupt

The past year has been a trying time for our family — the Laxalt family. Sadly, we have been forced to face the loss of several cherished family members. This challenge has made many of us stop and pause about what truly does matter in life.

During our journey, we have found a quote by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. that best captures the essence of a core value that has guided us throughout our lives — the value of speaking up for what is right. He wrote, “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”

In the spirit of King’s words, then, we can no longer be silent as we seek to maintain the integrity of our home state of Nevada.

Therefore, we collectively speak up to support Ross Miller as the most qualified candidate to be our state’s attorney general.

It is our belief that Ross Miller’s documented history of pulling himself up by his own bootstraps and establishing a well-respected career in law and public service while still maintaining a strong sense of family and community constitute the critical characteristics needed for Nevada’s highest legal office.

We ask that our fellow Nevadans follow our lead by speaking up with their own votes during this election season.

Know that our message does not originate from a Republican, Democratic or even family affiliation. It has to do with the most basic question all voters must ask themselves when they step into the voting booth, “Who really is the best qualified candidate for attorney general for the state of Nevada?”

source: http://m.lvsun.com/news/2014/oct/16/doing-whats-best-nevada/

Will Mr. Adam Laxalt who is running for Nevada Attorney General look the other way with regard to that Attorney General’s Office having a practice and a policy of withholding evidence from Plaintiff’s in cases?
adam_laxaltWill Mr. Adam Laxalt  who is running for Nevada Attorney General look the other way with regard to that Attorney General’s Office having a practice and a policy of withholding evidence from Plaintiff’s in cases?
We know that Secretary of State Ross Miller who is running for the same position does when he along with the Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval, and  Nevada Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto were presented with evidence by Ms. Tonja Brown during the December 5, 2011 and May 17, 2012 Board of Prison Commissioners meetings.
Ms. Brown provided the Commissioners with this information along with her documents that supported her testimony before them.  Ms. Brown asked of them to call for an outside investigation into the Attorney General’s Office.   Her testimony and documents were then stricken and removed from the record.

Brown claims that they did not place on the record her documents until after she had filed suit in July 2013 and to this day not all of the documents have seen the light of day, nor have they done as she had requested of them during the December 5, 2011 and May 17, 2012 Board of Prison Commissioners meeting.Tonja Brown informs Gov. Brian Sandoval and NAG Catherine Cortez Masto of 1st Amendment Rights violations and lawsuit

Ms. Brown filed suit against the Board of Prison Commissioners, NDOC, and DAG William Geddes and DAG Kara Krause in July 2013 for a Breach of Settlement Agreement she had made with the State in thewrongful death suit of her brother, Nolan Klein.
Brown claims that they did not place her documents on the record until after she filed suit and served them and as of this date not all of the documents have seen the light of day, nor have they done as she had requested of them and that they had her documents blocked from anyone accessing them.

judge tatro

She claims they have breached the terms ofthe Settlement Agreement she made with them.  A trial date has been set forApril 6 & 8, 2015 in the First Judicial District Court, Department 2 Judge James Wilson.

A brief summary of this case.

Nolan Klein passed away 5 years ago on September 20, 2009 from lack of medical care by the Nevada Department of Corrections.Just prior to Mr. Klein’s death the evidence was found hiding in the Washoe County District Attorney files that would have exonerated him from the 1988 Payless Shoe Store crime.

In October 2011 Ms. Brown hired a private investigator to locate the prime suspect, Mr. Zarsky.   The Sparks Police theory was they believed Mr. Zarsky had committed the crime Nolan Klein was convicted of.   In November Ms. Brown drove to another state and had the opportunity to listen to what Mr. Zarsky had to say.

Mr. Zarsky admitted he had knowledge of the Payless Shoe Store crime and the 3 other crimes the SPD believed he had committed. The victims from the 3 other crimes had cleared Mr. Klein and all was hidden by the Washoe County District Attorney’s office.

 In two of the cases the May 9, 1988 Payless Shoe Store robbery for which Mr. Klein was convicted of and the April 21,1988 armed robbery and attempted rape that the victim had cleared Mr. Klein of and hidden this fact from the defense and jury.  The victims in these cases two separate cases had described the knife as being red and black again, all hidden from the defense by Mr. Rachow and covered up by the Washoe County District Attorney’s Office.
In 2009 just prior to Mr. Klein’s death Judge Brent Adams ordered District Attorney Richard Gammick to turn over the DNA test results and the entire file in Mr. Klein’s case.    Located in the files were the handwritten notes from ADA Ronald Rachow defying a 1988 court order to turn over all of the evidence. The Washoe County District Attorney’s office knew about what Mr. Rachow had done and kept quite.

In Mr. Klein’s file were over 200 documents hidden from the defense mostly exculpatory evidence.  During the January 17 – 23 1989 trial  Mr. Rachow presented only 20 exhibits, mostly, photographs of the Payless Shoe Store crime scene.In 2010 Ms. Brown filed suit against the NDOC in the wrongful death of Nolan Klein.  During the discovery process Ms. Brown discovered that the Attorney General’s office had withheld evidence in one of Nolan’s federal civil cases against the NDOC.  Ms. Brown claims that ultimately this new development with regard to this evidence had a profound adverse effect on Mr. Klein’s  2007 Parole Board hearing and 2008 Compassionate Release Pardon.

 As a part of the Settlement Agreement  Ms. Brown made with the State she could exonerate their names.  When she went to do this at the December 5, 2011 and May 17, 2012 Board of Prison Commissioners they claimed the documents were deemed confidential and would not be placed on the record.  Ms. Brown demanded that they call for an investigation into the Attorney General’s Office for withholding evidence, file a complaint with the State Bar of Nevada against Mr. Geddes for withholding evidence in Mr. Klein’s federal case, and write a letter of apology to her.   They have refused to do so.Brown then filed suit Tonja Brown v NDOC, Governor Brian Sandoval, Attorney General Katherine Cortez Masto, Secretary of State Ross Miller, DAG William Geddes, DAG Kara Krause in Carson City, NV for Breach of Settlement Agreement. Trial is set for next April 2015.

Brown states that because of their refusal to as she has requested of them she has been prevented from seeking a Posthumous Pardon for Mr. Nolan Klein because the documents that were disseminated by the NDOC to the 2007 Parole Board and 2008 Pardons Board still  contain the  information pertaining to Mr. Klein and Ms. Brown.
Some of this false information was a direct result of a June 5, 2007 computer glitch that “FLIPPED” when the NOTIS software program was installed at the NDOC, thereby,  placing false felony charges in inmates files making it appear as though they have committed new crimes.
This information was then submitted to the 2007 Parole Board at which time Mr. Klein was appearing before them.  Mr. Klein then was denied his parole to the street in February 2008 and his previous granted paroles were revoked and he was placed back onto his first life sentence.
The following year, Mr. Klein appeared before the Nevada Pardons Board on a Compassionate Release Pardon because he was dying.  The Nevada Pardons Board consisted of the Nevada Supreme Court Justices, Attorney General Katherine Cortez Masto, and Governor James Gibbons. The Pardons Board were given a copy of the interview of Washoe County District Attorney Richard Gammick publicly admitting that he opened up Mr. Klein’s DNA and tested it. Mr. Klein’s attorney’s demanded to know where the test results were.
 The Nevada Pardons denied Mr. Klein a Compassionate Pardon and Mr. Klein died on September 20,2009.  At the time of Mr. Klein’s death his attorney’s were about to file their Motions for New Trial based on Newly Discovered evidence, and bail.  Mr. Klein’s criminal case was still pending on Appeal in the 9th Circuit.  Once Mr. Klein died everything became Moot!
Ms  Brown said “although Nolan is gone he is not forgotten.”   “The day he is given a Posthumous Pardon and Washoe County is held responsible for their actions will be the day I will let this go”
” the truth will be told in the upcoming release of her book “To Prove His Innocence  A Sister’s Love”

 

Miller vs. Laxalt: Polar opposites on same-sex marriage

no gayBy Ray Hagar, RGJ

With the news about the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco declaring gay marriage legal in Nevada on Tuesday, voters might want to take a look at the stances on same sex-marriage by the candidates running for Nevada attorney general.

The differences on the subject are stark when comparing the views of Democrat Ross Miller and Republican Adam Laxalt.

Miller is a same-sex marriage proponent while Laxalt is not.

When asked for his opinion on Tuesday’s ruling Miller said in an email: “”I support marriage equality, and support the Governor’s decision not to appeal.”gay 2

Miller was referencing Gov. Brian Sandoval decision in February not to defend Nevada’s ban on same-sex marriage since recent rulings on same-sex marriage made Nevada’s ban “no longer defensible in court,” according to a statement from Sandoval’s office at the time.

In June, Miller told the Las Vegas Sun he thought Nevada’s ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional. Miller also said he would vote to legalize gay marriage if it were on the ballot.

“It’s clear looking at case law that Nevada’s ban is unconstitutional,” he told the Sun.

Laxalt has taken an opposite view. He has stated on various occasions that he believes marriage is between a man and a woman.

He also said in February that he disagreed with Sandoval and Masto and would have continued to defend Nevada’s ban on same-sex marriage, even if others thought it was no longer defensible in court because of recent judicial rulings.

He said Wednesday that he is still reviewing the current ruling on the issue. He said he would protect people’s rights to same-sex marriage if it were law.

“The ruling by the Ninth Circuit’s panel of judges was handed down just yesterday, and I am currently reviewing their opinion,” Laxalt said in an email. “As I have stated throughout my campaign for attorney general, I will enforce the laws and the Constitution of Nevada, regardless of my politics and personal beliefs.”

Laxalt, a former U.S. Navy JAG officer, wrote an essay on the U.S. military’s former “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy regarding gays in the military in 2010 for The American Spectator. he was concerned about “straight” military members living with gay military members.

“It is one thing for the military to ask its members to accept homosexuals, but another for the military to ask its members to accept and live with homosexuality, the homosexual lifestyle,” Laxalt wrote.

Laxalt also questioned how gay and lesbian officers would be promoted into leadership roles in the Navy.

“Will the political pressure on flag officer leadership force a homosexual into command, regardless of ability?” Laxalt wrote in 2010. “If so, will his sailors respect and follow? The consequences are realistic and dire. Currently a homosexual can gain such a command by merit alone, but for the cultural crusaders who fundamentally believe gays must be open no matter what the cost, competence is not a compelling military interest.”

Nevada voted approved its same-sex marriage ban by overwhelmingly approving it during elections in 2000 and 2002. Laxalt views mirror those of many conservatives in Nevada, including activist Janine Hansen.

“In 2000 and 2002, Nevadans voted overwhelmingly by (almost) 70 percent to put marriage between a man and a woman in the constitution,” Hansen said Tuesday. “Now by judicial activism, the will of the people is overturned by unelected and unaccountable federal judges. We are no longer a Republic having lost our rights as ‘we the people’ to the dictatorial judiciary.”

Source: http://www.rgj.com/story/news/2014/10/08/miller-vs-laxalt-polar-opposites-sex-marriage/16938339/

RGJ: Despite a quiet election, the AG race is getting nasty Despite a quiet election, the AG race is getting nasty

ross miller dick size

My dick is this big says Ross Miller

To hear Robert Uithoven tell it, the Adam Laxalt’s campaign for attorney general is gaining on the favored Democrat, Ross Miller. Now, the two are almost running neck-and-neck, Uithoven said.

“This race at the beginning of the summer was a 15-point race,” Uithoven, Laxalt’s lead consultant, said. “Then it became a 13 point race then it became for us, 11 points. Ross put something up the other day saying it (margin) is eight. The R-J had it at five and we have it closer than that.

“We’re within the margin of error and we still have month to go,” Uithoven said, noting Election Day is Nov. 4.

Laxalt’s campaign did not publicly release the polling, which makes Miller suspect.

Uithoven’s assertion came just days after the Las Vegas Review-Journal’s own polling showed Miller was ahead by five points. In mid-September, a Greenberg Quinlan Rosner poll showed Miller up by eight points.nasty

“Here are the facts,” said Miller, Nevada current secretary of state. “Have they released a poll? They still haven’t released any poll. I’ve seen two polls out there. One that showed I was up eight and another that showed I was up by five. That was after they spent $1.4 million going after me on this stupid issue about gifts. So if this was going to resonate, they should have already released a poll showing that they are ahead.”

So what about the “stupid issue about gifts”?

It’s another factor that Laxalt has been using against Miller. He has noted Miller’s own financial disclosure forms show Miller has taken about $70,000 in contributions defined as gifts during his eight-year tenure as secretary of state. It was an issue in the candidates’ first debate — in front of the Nevada Press Association last month.

Miller said the charge is bogus. But clearly, it has struck a nerve.

“I encourage the public to look at the substance of what has been reported,” he said during the debate. “I have gone above and beyond to disclose absolutely everything of value, including things that probably didn’t need to be disclosed, because we don’t have clear guidance in the statues about what needs to be disclosed.”

Uithoven said the issue about gifts is a key reason why Laxalt, a former U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General officer, is catching Miller in polling — that voters are appalled by the gifts.

“Its access to the PGA tournament out there at Montreux,” Uithoven said. “It is access to UFC fights, its taking trips. And it is excessive. It is beyond excessive. It is almost like he is trying to set the Nevada record for most gifts accepted.”

Miller has said much of the “gift” expenses came from attending educational seminarsand other opportunities that helped him improve as secretary of state.

“The overall majority of items I reported as gifts really constitute educational opportunities,” Miller said. “One of the things they (Laxalt and Uithoven) made a big deal about was a trip up to Aspen (Colo.). That was in reality, sponsored by the Aspen Institute; where you study principles of democracy in an effort reduce partisanship. It was an educational opportunity. I became a better leader because of it.”

Uithoven noted Miller did not break any laws accepting gifts.

“He fiercely defends his record of taking $70,000 in gifts because the Legislature has yet to ban it, outright,” Uithoven said. “Let’s hope someday they do that.”

A tough campaign

The gift issue is only one of the controversies that has developed around the attorney general’s race.

And in an otherwise quiet election year, the race for attorney general has become the most controversial of the year.

The lieutenant governor’s race between Democrat Assemblywoman Lucy Flores and Republican state Sen. Mark Hutchison has received much attention, but the attorney general’s race has been more antagonistic, experts said.

It is Nevada’s royal blood feud. Miller is the son of Nevada’s longest-serving governor, Gov. Bob Miller. Laxalt is the grandson of former U.S. Sen. and Nevada Gov. Paul Laxalt.

“This is clearly the nastiest race out there,” said Eric Herzik, political science professor at the University of Nevada, Reno. “And I think it’s been more from Miller’s side than Laxalt’s side.

“Miller has been very defensive,” Herzik said about his campaign tactics. “I think Miller’s people just assumed he would cruise. Even when Laxalt jumped in, I think the Miller people still assumed he would just cruise.”

Miller wants to see documentation of Laxalt’s polling that shows him being within the margin of error, Herzik noted. But that request cuts both ways.

“Why isn’t Miller showing his polls?” Herzik said. “If you are up by eight points…”

Last week, former USS Cole Cmmdr. Kirk Lippold filed an ethics complaint against Miller.

Lippold, a Carson City resident, alleged Miller had an unfair advantage over Laxalt because Miller’s photo, name and title was shown on the Web portal used by the overseas military who wish to vote in Nevada elections.

Like Lippold, Laxalt is a former Navy officer. Lippold unsuccessfully ran as a Republican in the 2012 special election for Nevada’s 2nd District U.S. House seat, losing to current U.S. Rep. Mark Amodei, R-Carson City.

“It is clearly politically motivated,” Miller said.

Miller’s office quickly removed the photo and personal references after Lippold’s complaint.

“I just can’t believe that this gets any coverage,” Miller said. “It’s just one of those silly transparent complaints that you see every election cycle, 30 days out (from the general election).

“The simple fact is I have a banner with my name and picture on every page of the website to let people know it is the official site of the secretary of state,” Miller said. “We don’t have time to get dragged into these political stunts. We got a complaint; we took the picture down, hoping to just put the issue to bed. And it is unfortunate they just keep trying to spin this to make a partisan issue out of what really is a ground-breaking innovation to make it easier for our troops fighting overseas easier to vote.”

Lippold praised Miller’s efforts to improve the military’s access to voting as secretary of state, but felt the photo and personal references on the page were too much. Even though Miller has changed the portal’s look, Lippold still wants the Nevada Commission on Ethics to review the matter.

“The system that Ross Miller has put in place, it could be a national example,” Lippold said. “But you want to make sure that if anything, it should be setting the highest standards for every other state to emulate as they go forward in having a secured Internet method of allowing out military folks employed overseas to vote.

“(Yet) I felt that having his picture flashed up there when he is running for office was inappropriate. And that is what I called him on,” Lippold said. “Had he not been running for office, I probably would not have jumped in as stridently.”

The ‘trainwreck’ issue

Laxalt, a first-time candidate who moved to Las Vegas three years ago after he got out of the Navy, seemed like a political corpse not long ago.

Leaked performance-review notes from the Las Vegas law firm that employs Laxalt referred to him as “a trainwreck” who “doesn’t even have the basic skill set” to be a good lawyer.”

The review notes included a recommendation of “a freeze in salary, deferral and possible termination” for Laxalt at the Lewis and Roca law firm.

“It was a bad month,” Uithoven said about the struggle to overcome the “trainwreck” documents, first released to the public by journalist Jon Ralston but picked up by media in both Reno and Las Vegas.

Now, Laxalt’s campaign is accusing Miller of wrapping his campaign around “leaked documents that were stolen” from Laxalt’s law firm.

“You have leaked documents that were stolen and used for fire by the guy running to be the state’s top lawyer,” Uithoven said. “A law was broken and the guy running for the state’s top lawyer seems to benefit from that.”

Miller said Uithoven is mixing facts. His campaign had nothing to do with neither leaking nor publishing the “trainwreck” documents.

“I didn’t leak those documents,” Miller said. “I don’t know who did. And I don’t know if any laws were broken to release those documents.

“But Mr. Laxalt’s response was alarming and pathetic,” Miller said. “He first questioned the authenticity of the documents, remember that? Then he later had to acknowledge they were authentic.

“He (Laxalt) said he had never seen those documents,” Miller said. “But if you look at them, (the attorney) who prepared them acknowledged that they had reviewed his (Laxalt’s) performance reviews with him. So it looks like he (Laxalt) is not telling the truth there. And now he is trying to shift the story, pointing the finger at us when we didn’t have anything to do with it.”

Miller said he’s learned a big lesson about Laxalt from the leaked documents.

“It has never come out in public, nor have they (Laxalt campaign staff) tried to explain how someone who got performance reviews that bad can make a credible case to become the state’s top attorney,” Miller said.

Herzik believes Miller will beat Laxalt — but Laxalt is a competitive opponent.

“I believe Miller is winning and is going to win,” Herzik said. “But this is not a race where he can say, ‘Hey, I can take out my starters and not play the second half.'”

Ross Miller’s office changes website amid ethics complaint

Miller’s office changes website amid ethics complaint

CARSON CITY — While Secretary of State Ross Miller on Wednesday called an ethics complaint against him “silly,” his office nevertheless has modified the agency’s website to remove his photo and other information from an online election portal for overseas voters to participate in the Nov. 4 general election.

The ethics complaint dated Sept. 29 was filed by Kirk Lippold, a retired U.S. Navy commander who said that the use of Miller’s name, photograph and title in a banner featured on the Web portal was an effort to secure “unwarranted privileges and preferences” in his campaign for attorney general.

Lippold also filed an election complaint with Miller’s office.

The Web portal set up by Miller’s office for military and overseas civilian voters to participate in the Nov. 4 general election now just says “Nevada Secretary of State.”

Miller on Wednesday called the filing “one of those silly complaints” Nevada voters have come to expect 30 days out from an election.

Miller, a Democrat, is running against Republican Adam Laxalt and Independent American Jonathan Hansen for the attorney general’s office.

Bob Walsh, deputy secretary of state for Southern Nevada, said the website was modified Wednesday afternoon just to put an end to the issue.

“The whole thing is just a waste of our time,” he said. “Quite frankly the office has better things to do than respond to political stunts. We have work to do. We’re moving on.”

The Laxalt campaign said in response that the Lippold complaints were clearly serious enough to force the secretary of state’s office to change the Web pages.

“Ross Miller and his campaign initially referred to these two complaints as a ‘stunt’ and a ‘silly’ issue,” says the statement from Robert Uithoven, campaign consultant to Laxalt. “It reminds us of when he called Adam Laxalt’s pledge not to accept political gifts as a ‘gimmick.’ We are encouraged to see that the Secretary of State’s office took corrective measures to prevent further possible illegal electioneering by Ross Miller.”

Contact Capital Bureau reporter Sean Whaley at swhaley@reviewjournal.com or 775-687-3900. Find him on Twitter: @seanw801.

RJ poll: Hutchison winning lieutenant governor, margins tax failing, In the attorney general’s race, Democrat Ross Miller would pull off a narrow victory, 44-39, over Republican Adam Laxalt, according to the poll commissioned by the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

…But Lucy Flores is way way hotter than this ugly dude.

If the November election were today, Republican state Sen. Mark Hutchison would handily defeat Democratic Assemblywoman Lucy Flores 47 percent to 35 percent of the vote in the lieutenant governor’s race, which could also affect GOP Gov. Brian Sandoval’s future, a new poll shows.

In the attorney general’s race, Democrat Ross Miller would pull off a narrow victory, 44-39, over Republican Adam Laxalt, according to the poll commissioned by the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

But the wide-open race for secretary of state between Republican Barbara Cegavske, a state senator, and Democrat Kate Marshall, the state treasurer, is a statistical tie, 43-42 for Cegavske.

Finally, a proposed business margins tax to fund education, Question 3 on the ballot, appears headed for defeat with more likely Nevada voters against it than for it, 40-37, while more than one-fifth of voters, or 23 percent, remain uncertain how they’ll vote in the final weeks before the Nov. 4 general election.

On Question 3, the results are well within the margin of error — plus or minus 4.2 percentage points — said the pollster, SurveyUSA. Republicans oppose Q3 by 30 points, while Democrats support it by 34 points, showing a strong partisan divide. Independents could decide the matter, siding with the GOP in opposing the margins tax by 30 percentage points, the survey said.

Lower-income voters support Q3 and upper-income voters oppose it. Women are split, while men oppose the proposed tax, which would apply to businesses making $1 million or more in annual revenue even if they are not profitable. The proceeds are supposed to go toward education, but there’s no guarantee — the Legislature could move the money around.

“If ‘Yes’ wins, it will be because traditional Democratic constituencies are under-counted in this survey,” the pollster said. “Opposition to ballot measures — having nothing to do with Nevada and nothing in particular to do with Question 3 — typically increases as Election Day approaches. Q3 supporters have their work cut out.”

The survey of 569 likely Nevada voters was conducted by SurveyUSA over both land lines and cell phones fromSept. 29 through Oct. 1. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.2 percentage points.

In the lieutenant governor’s race, Hutchison smashes Flores 47-35, but Mark Little of the Independent American Party is a potential spoiler, picking up 6 percent of the vote. Another 3 percent of survey respondents said they would vote for “None of these candidates,” a statewide option in Nevada.

Hutchison leads by 19 percentage points among men, said the pollster, and has twice as many Democrats who say they would cross-over and vote Republican as do Republicans who plan to vote Democratic.

“Moderates break for the Republican, a bad sign for any Democrat,” the pollster said.

The race has taken on an outsize importance this year. Sandoval has no real Democratic opposition and is expected to skate to re-election. There is speculation that Sandoval, a former federal judge, might not finish his four-year term and return to the bench, run for vice president or join the Cabinet of a Republican president. He also could make a U.S. Senate bid against Senate Majority Harry Reid, D-Nev., in 2016.

If any of those jobs lure Sandoval out of the Governor’s Mansion, the lieutenant governor elected next month would automatically replace him.

The attorney general’s race is proving to be far more competitive than anticipated by Secretary of State Miller, who has won two, four-year terms in his current statewide office job and has high name recognition thanks to his father, former Gov. Bob Miller, as well.

Laxalt’s grandfather is former Gov. and U.S. Sen. Paul Laxalt, but the younger Laxalt moved to Nevada for his law practice just a few ago and this is his first run at public office.

A month out, Miller has a “razor-thin 5 point advantage over” Laxalt because the 44-39 result is just outside the margin of error, the pollster said.

Again, the Independent American Party candidate, Jonathan J. Hansen, takes 7 percent, and “seriously confounds any calculus of the contest,” making it harder to call, the pollster said.

“If Miller wins, it will be thanks to moderate voters: he leads among self-described moderates by 17 points,” according to the pollster. “If Laxalt overtakes, it may be because of a Republican ‘wave’ that some foresee coast-to-coast in 2014.”

Millions of dollars in outside ad spending in the race by GOP and Democratic attorneys general organizations and others may help determine the outcome.

The open secretary of state’s race is a true one-on-one contest with neither candidate dominating any one voter group, thus the current 43-42 statistical dead heat.

“The candidates truly are battling for each last vote: neither candidate reaches 50 percent among males, females, the young, the old, whites, blacks, Hispanics, independents or moderates,” the pollster said. “Either candidate could win, and a close finish would not be an upset regardless of the top vote-getter.”

Some five percent of voters said they will choose “None of these candidates” in that race. Another 10 percent were undecided.

Election 2014: Nevada Lt. Gov. candidates tout backgrounds at Carson City Community Center along with Congress District 2 candidates

Mark Hutchison and Democratic opponent Lucy Flores disagreed on issues that are beyond the reach of the office they seek.Candidates for Lieutenant Governor Lucy Flores and Mark Hutchison come to the issues — especially education — from diverse ends of the spectrum.

Flores, a Democratic Assemblywoman from Las Vegas, told the League of Women Voters candidate forum Tuesday she understands “the challenges everyday Nevadans face.”

“I have experience with those challenges firsthand,” she said saying her mother left when she was nine and, when she failed every exam on purpose, “no one noticed.”

“I ended up on juvenile parole by 15. By 17, I was a drop out,” she said.

She said she’s now a practicing attorney because, “eventually, I did get some one who made a difference in my life and surprisingly, it was my parole officer.”

She said all children deserve the same access to a high-quality education and “what was done for me should be done for others.”

Hutchison a Republican state senator from Las Vegas, said he’s a third generation Nevadan whose grandfather came to Nevada during the depression. He said his dad worked for Ahern 45 years and he started working at the business when he was 12. He went to law school and built a law practice while raising six children.

“At the end of the day, I have lived the American dream,” he said. “I want to help as many Nevadans as possible live the American dream.”

Both emphasized the importance of education.

“Education is to state government what national defense is to the federal government,” Hutchison said. “It’s the one thing you’d better get right.”

He said in the 2013 session, lawmakers and Gov. Brian Sandoval pumped $50 million into English Language Learner programs.

But Flores quickly pointed out that wasn’t new money.

“What is being referred to as an addition is actually a replacement,” she said. “We’ve cut education a billion dollars but replaced only a quarter of that. I will continue to fight for a real increase in funding.”

Asked whether they support the ballot question removing constitutional protections limiting taxes on the mining industry, Flores said yes, it should be replaced with “a broad-cased, reasonable tax structure so we spread that liability amongst all industries in Nevada.”

Hutchison cautioned the state “not do something that constrains (mining’s) ability to employ Nevadans.” But he did say he voted for putting the question on the ballot.

Both said if the teacher’s tax plan — the margins tax — passes, the state should make sure the money raised goes to education and isn’t diverted elsewhere in the state budget.

Asked about the increased college fees the questioner said are pricing college out of reach for the average student, Hutchison said more competition would help bring prices down. He pointed tovocational schools such as ITT Tech as alternatives for Nevada’s colleges and other ways such as Internet classes.

“We need really to allow people to get into good paying jobs that may or may not be going to college,” he said.

Flores said Nevada hasn’t done a good job of aligning workforce needs withworkforce development. She said despite a longtime shortage of healthcare workers, “only recently did we start expanding our nursing programs.”

Where she said she supports background checks to purchase guns, Hutchison said he saw the bill vetoed by Sandoval as creating a federal gun registry.

Hutchison, Flores disagree over Tesla in Reno debate

During a debate taped Monday for the Nevada Newsmakers television show, Republican candidate for lieutenant governor Mark Hutchison and Democratic opponent Lucy Flores disagreed on issues that are beyond the reach of the office they seek.

The debate is to be shown at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday on KRNV News 4 but eventually will be televised statewide by day’s end.

Hutchison, a state senator from Las Vegas, and Flores, an assemblywoman from Las Vegas, had their sharpest disagreements on the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), the public transparency of the Tesla Motors mega-deal with Nevada and the funding of Northern Nevada infrastructure improvements to deal with the boon expected from the Tesla battery gigafactory.

None of those issues can be directly affected by the role of lieutenant governor. Anything is open in this race because of the speculation that current Gov. Brian Sandoval could run for the U.S. Senate in 2016 against Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

If Sandoval would defeat Reid, the winner of this lieutenant governor’s race would automatically become Nevada’s next governor. Therefore, many issues have become part of the campaign.

Health-care law

Hutchison was Nevada’s lead counsel in its lawsuit to overturn the federalAffordable Health Care Act in 2012. He lamented its impact on Nevada, despite voting three times as a state senator to implement its provisions in Nevada.

“In terms of providing health care, I supported the governor’s budget that expandedMedicaid,” Hutchison said. “It gives opportunities for those who need it the most to have access to health care,” Hutchison said.

Hutchison added: “Obamacare has not been right for Nevada. We’ve seen prices go up for the government, for patients who are insured. We have seen people kicked off their heath care (plans). And Obamacare, I just don’t think is right for Nevada.”

Flores said she “vehemently” disagreed.

“The fact is we have affordable health care now for so many Nevadans,” Flores said. “You cannot get kicked off your insurance. You can insure your children when they are in college.

“Quite frankly, my father was able to get expanded insurance and save hundreds and hundreds of dollars because he had an urgent medical need,” said Flores, who like Hutchison is a lawyer. “I am very happy that my opponent failed in his attempt to take those benefits away from the people of Nevada (in the Obamacare lawsuit).”

The disagreement over funding of school construction in Washoe County flared up when the candidates were asked about their plans to deal with the infrastructure overload on school, roads and public safety with the Tesla battery gigafactory.

It is set to be built 17 miles east of the Reno-Sparks area at the Tahoe Reno Industrial Center. Many of its 6,000 to 6,500 expected workers will live in Washoe County.

Washoe schools

Flores said Hutchison did not support AB46 during the 2013 Legislature – the bill that would have added funding for the Washoe school district’s capital spending to fix its aging inventory of schools. Instead, Assembly Republicans helped steer the issue to the Washoe County Commission, which eventually killed it.

“Unfortunately, my opponent passed on supporting a bill that would have allowed the Washoe school district to improve on their buildings and repair the very old structures of our schools here in Washoe County,” Flores said. “It was incredibly needed, and they (Republicans) punted it to the Washoe County Commission and you can see that it did not occur.”

Flores noted that Tesla will help school funding. The electric car company will give $7.5 million an year to Nevada’s K-12 education over five years, according to its deal with the state.

“Tesla is going to give a certain amount of funds to the schools,” she said. “However, that is not for several years. So we have to deal with (school funding) issues as they come up.”

Hutchison defended moving the Washoe school-renovation funding issue to the county commission. Local issues are best handled by local leaders, he said.

“I am a person who believes that local government ought to solve local issues and I think many of my fellow legislators feel the same way,” Hutchison said.

“If there are issues in Clark County regarding school matters, particularly in school construction and school infrastructure, I think that is best handled by local authorities,” he said. “I see the same thing for Washoe County. Those government entities that are closest to the parents, closest to the issues make the best decisions.”

Tesla transparency

Flores and Hutchison also clashed over the transparency of the Tesla deal, which includes tax abatements that could reach about $1.3 billion.

Flores noted she was asked by the RGJ Media editorial board what she would have done differently if she were in on the Tesla negotiations from the beginning.

“That package, when it arrived to us at the Legislature, was essentially a done deal,” she said. “We were attempting to do as much as we could to provide transparency, to provide accountability.”

Flores said she would have fought for paying prevailing wages during the construction of the Tesla site.

“Certainly if we could have gotten prevailing wage, that is absolutely something that I would have fought for at the beginning, at the front end certainly not at the back end,” she said.

Flores twice said during the debate she “won’t be a rubber stamp.”

“Just because the governor – or anybody else for that matter – comes in and says ‘This is a great idea, do it,’ we’re not just going to say ‘Yes, fantastic.’ There needs to be a process of accountability,” she said.

Hutchison defended the way Sandoval handled the deal with Tesla.

“We had Texas, California, New Mexico and Arizona all competing (for Tesla),” Hutchison said. “And as a necessity, I can tell you as a business lawyer, a lot of times those business transactions and business discussions are confidential. And if you don’t agree with those terms, they are not going to negotiate with you.

“We got Tesla,” Hutchison said. “And that was the buzz all across the country.”

Many of the infrastructure needs will be solved by “good jobs” and the local taxes that come with them, Hutchison said.

“A good job will solve many of the challenges, in terms of the impact we have on our schools, on our social services and law enforcement,” Hutchison said. “So, good jobs solve a lot of those challenges.”

•••

The only candidate for Nevada Attorney General to show up for the league forum in Carson City was Republican Adam Laxalt. Democrat Ross Miller wasn’t there and didn’t send a representative or statement.

Laxalt said his training and experience as a Naval officer help qualify him for the job of Nevada’s top legal officer. He said that includes service in the Middle East where he worked in detainee operations, the unit setup to handle terrorists in Iraq.

He said one of the things he would do as AG is create a military legal service to support former troops.

He said he would continue Catherine Cortez Masto’s efforts to aggressively attack the growing problem of human trafficking.

“We need to keep on the offensive,” he said.

He said he also would work to fight against invasive federal regulations and support continued efforts to prevent Yucca Mountain from ever opening as a nuclear waste dump.

Congress District 2 candidates spar at Carson City Community Center

Democrat Kristin Spees of Incline Village charged Rep. Mark Amodei, R-Nev., hasn’t done enough in the three years he has been in that office.

“Look at his voting record. Roads and bridges are falling apart. What has he done? What has he done to support our veterans,” she asked.

Amodei said he has moved heavy lands bills as a member of the Public Lands Committee and brought legislation on a number of Nevada issues as a member of Appropriations and the Public Lands committees.

That includes a half dozen lands bills for Nevada including the Yerington Lands Bill and the potential listing of the sage hen as endangered; he said he has been working on those issues for three years.

Amodei said he and his staff “have tried to establish ourselves as people who are work horses, not show horses.”

As for the sage hen, he said, as a member of Appropriations, he managed to insert language delaying potential listing of the bird for another year.

“It’s not the bird that’s in danger; it’s the habitat,” he said. “What happened to the habitat? It burned up. It’s not because of more cows, more sheep, people on dirt bikes.”

Spees said she doesn’t want the land listed “because we lose access to our public lands.”

Independent American Party candidate Janine Hansen agreed the problem is wildfires, not human-caused loss of habitat. She said those fires are the BLM’s fault.

The three aired their views at the a League Of Women Voter’s forum Tuesday night at the Carson City Community Center.

Spees said she has crisscrossed the northern half of the state that makes up District 2 and knows the issues and the needs of its residents. She charged Amodei missed more than twice the number of votes the average congressman did this past year.

Many of those missed votes, however, were held while he was recovering from surgery to repair a detached retina, which he said requires the patient be pretty much immobilized.

On the Affordable Health Care Act, Spees said everyone needs healthcare and, if the law is flawed, “let’s find those problems and solve it. Let’s fix the ACA and not try repeal it.”

“The political reality is for the next 24 months, Affordable Care is not going to be repealed,” said Amodei.

He said Congress needs to do the things it should have done before it was voted into law at 2 a.m. without members having time to read it.

Hansen said the act has raised the cost of medicine for people working in Elko area mines and reduced their benefits.

“What you have with this is socialized medicine,” she said.

All agreed the immigration system needs repairs and now.

Amodei said he’s for reform but a decent bill by a bipartisan group hasn’t made it to a vote.

Hansen said people are “pouring over the border and we need to respond to this crisis and protect America first.”

Spees said it’s necessary “we reform immigration right now.”

She said the number one concern of seniors is social security but the question is how to protect it.

“We can’t privatize Social Security. That’s your retirement,” she said. “What if Goldman-Sachs got a hold of it.”

Amodei said people “need to demand courage from your people (elected officials).”

“If you disagree with what they do, every two years you can fire them,” he said referring to the election cycle for House members.

Hansen said the reason Social Security is in financial trouble is Congress has taken money from the fund repeatedly for other needs.

She said the focus of her campaign is the need to cut taxes and “unconstitutional spending,” promote free enterprise and job creation.

Spees said she is “owned by no one and therefore can vote for the constituents’ best interests.”

Amodei said elections are a personnel session: “We try to make the basis of whether we get elected or not the job you’re doing — if you want a worker, that’s us.”

Adam Laxalt: A look at the secret son of former senator Pete Domenici

Adam Laxalt: A look at the secret son of former senator Pete Domenici

Updated Thursday with photo

Adam Laxalt has some serious political genes: Grandfather Paul Laxaltis a former senator and governor of Nevada, not to mention a best friend of Ronald Reagan; mother Michelle Laxalt has worked as a high-profile Washington lobbyist and cable pundit.


Former senator Pete Domenici (R-N.M.), on Capitol Hill last week. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)
Now we know there’s more to the story: Retired New Mexico senatorPete Domenici, 80, announced this week that Adam is his illegitimate son.

“More than 30 years ago, I fathered a child outside of my marriage,” Domenici said in a statement to the Albuquerque Journal. “The mother of that child made me pledge that we would never reveal that parenthood, and I have tried to honor that pledge and so has she.”

But the carefully protected secret went public Wednesday, throwing the 34-year-old lawyer into the spotlight.

“I have lived my entire life as a private citizen and intend to remain one,” he told our colleague Rachel Weiner. “I plan to address personal issues privately and will not be commenting or joining any public discussion.”


Adam Laxalt as a senior at Georgetown University in 2001. (Ye Domesday Booke)
Laxalt, who grew up in Alexandria and now practices law in Las Vegas, boasts an impressive résumé: Jobs with Undersecretary of State John Bolton and Sen.John Warner, then five years as a Navy officer, including a deployment to Iraq.

Recently married, the strikingly handsome lawyer is a vocal conservative who has written op-eds for the Las Vegas Review-Journal, National Review Onlineand American Spectator. He also appears to be a burgeoning community leader, recently named to the board of the local Catholic Charities.

All this came after a troubled adolescence. In a 1999 profile in Washingtonian magazine, Laxalt discussed his teenage alcoholism: He started drinking as a freshman at St. Stephen’s and St. Agnes School in Alexandria, and hit bottom at Tulane University in hard-partying New Orleans. A family intervention helped him go straight, he told the magazine: “Looking at my grandfather, whom I respect more than anyone with the exception of my mother, and to see how disappointed I made them was real rough.” After treatment at the Hazelden center in Minnesota (“The best thing that’s ever happened to me in my life”), he transferred to Georgetown, where he got his bachelor’s and law degrees.


Paul Laxalt in 1984. (Frank Johnston)
It is unclear whether Laxalt grew up knowing that Domenici was his father. In Michelle Laxalt’s statement to the Journal, she said that the pregnancy was the result of “one night’s mistake” and that she chose to raise Adam as a single parent. Both her father and Domenici were Republican senators at the time; she said she asked the married Domenici, who has eight other children, to keep the matter “private between the two of us.”

Very private, it seems. Even Michelle’s sister, Kathleen, said she didn’t know the identity of Adam’s father. “It was a big surprise to me,” she told us Wednesday. The subject was never discussed: “That was sort of a private thing for Michelle, and we respected that all these years.”

Also unclear: why the news emerged now, more than three decades after Adam’s birth. In their statements, both parents suggest their hand was forced. “Recently information has come to me that this sacred situation might be twisted, re-written out of whole cloth and shopped to press outlets large and small in a vicious attempt to smear, hurt and diminish Pete Domenici, an honorable man, his extraordinary wife, Nancy, and other innocents,” Michelle wrote.

Is there something going around? Last week, Rep. Steve Cohenrevealed that he also had a secret child. The Tennessee Democrat raised eyebrows when he tweeted, then deleted, cutesy messages to a 24-year-old Houston woman. (“Nice to know you were watchin SOTU Happy Valentines beautiful girl. Ilu.”) After criticism from the state GOP director, the 63-year-old revealed that the woman is the daughter he learned about a few years ago after reconnecting with a long-lost girlfriend; they now have a close relationship.

Cohen told our colleague Rosalind Helderman that he had been trying to keep the secret to protect his daughter’s privacy. “It’s awful,” he said. “Bloggers and people saying nasty things. It’s disgusting.”

Will Mr. Adam Laxalt who is running for Nevada Attorney General look the other way with regard to that Attorney General’s Office having a practice and a policy of withholding evidence from Plaintiff’s in cases?

adam_laxaltWill Mr. Adam Laxalt  who is running for Nevada Attorney General look the other way with regard to that Attorney General’s Office having a practice and a policy of withholding evidence from Plaintiff’s in cases?
We know that Secretary of State Ross Miller who is running for the same position does when he along with the Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval, and  Nevada Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto were presented with evidence by Ms. Tonja Brown during the December 5, 2011 and May 17, 2012 Board of Prison Commissioners meetings.
Ms. Brown provided the Commissioners with this information along with her documents that supported her testimony before them.  Ms. Brown asked of them to call for an outside investigation into the Attorney General’s Office.   Her testimony and documents were then stricken and removed from the record.
Brown claims that they did not place on the record her documents until after she had filed suit in July 2013 and to this day not all of the documents have seen the light of day, nor have they done as she had requested of them during the December 5, 2011 and May 17, 2012 Board of Prison Commissioners meeting.

Tonja Brown informs Gov. Brian Sandoval and NAG Catherine Cortez Masto of 1st Amendment Rights violations and lawsuit

Tonja Brown informs Gov. Brian Sandoval and NAG Catherine Cortez Masto of 1st Amendment Rights violations and lawsuit

Ms. Brown filed suit against the Board of Prison Commissioners, NDOC, and DAG William Geddes and DAG Kara Krause in July 2013 for a Breach of Settlement Agreement she had made with the State in the wrongful death suit of her brother, Nolan Klein.
Brown claims that they did not place her documents on the record until after she filed suit and served them and as of this date not all of the documents have seen the light of day, nor have they done as she had requested of them and that they had her documents blocked from anyone accessing them.

judge tatro

She claims they have breached the terms of the Settlement Agreement she made with them.  A trial date has been set for April 6 & 8, 2015 in the First Judicial District Court, Department 2 Judge James Wilson.

A brief summary of this case.
Nolan Klein passed away 5 years ago on September 20, 2009 from lack of medical care by the Nevada Department of Corrections.

Just prior to Mr. Klein’s death the evidence was found hiding in the Washoe County District Attorney files that would have exonerated him from the 1988 Payless Shoe Store crime.

In October 2011 Ms. Brown hired a private investigator to locate the prime suspect, Mr. Zarsky.   The Sparks Police theory was they believed Mr. Zarsky had committed the crime Nolan Klein was convicted of.   In November Ms. Brown drove to another state and had the opportunity to listen to what Mr. Zarsky had to say.

Mr. Zarsky admitted he had knowledge of the Payless Shoe Store crime and the 3 other crimes the SPD believed he had committed. The victims from the 3 other crimes had cleared Mr. Klein and all was hidden by the Washoe County District Attorney’s office.

 In two of the cases the May 9, 1988 Payless Shoe Store robbery for which Mr. Klein was convicted of and the April 21,1988 armed robbery and attempted rape that the victim had cleared Mr. Klein of and hidden this fact from the defense and jury.  The victims in these cases two separate cases had described the knife as being red and black again, all hidden from the defense by Mr. Rachow and covered up by the Washoe County District Attorney’s Office.
In 2009 just prior to Mr. Klein’s death Judge Brent Adams ordered District Attorney Richard Gammick to turn over the DNA test results and the entire file in Mr. Klein’s case.    Located in the files were the handwritten notes from ADA Ronald Rachow defying a 1988 court order to turn over all of the evidence. The Washoe County District Attorney’s office knew about what Mr. Rachow had done and kept quite.
In Mr. Klein’s file were over 200 documents hidden from the defense mostly exculpatory evidence.  During the January 17 – 23 1989 trial  Mr. Rachow presented only 20 exhibits, mostly, photographs of the Payless Shoe Store crime scene.

In 2010 Ms. Brown filed suit against the NDOC in the wrongful death of Nolan Klein.  During the discovery process Ms. Brown discovered that the Attorney General’s office had withheld evidence in one of Nolan’s federal civil cases against the NDOC.  Ms. Brown claims that ultimately this new development with regard to this evidence had a profound adverse effect on Mr. Klein’s  2007 Parole Board hearing and 2008 Compassionate Release Pardon.

 As a part of the Settlement Agreement  Ms. Brown made with the State she could exonerate their names.  When she went to do this at the December 5, 2011 and May 17, 2012 Board of Prison Commissioners they claimed the documents were deemed confidential and would not be placed on the record.  Ms. Brown demanded that they call for an investigation into the Attorney General’s Office for withholding evidence, file a complaint with the State Bar of Nevada against Mr. Geddes for withholding evidence in Mr. Klein’s federal case, and write a letter of apology to her.   They have refused to do so.

Brown then filed suit Tonja Brown v NDOC, Governor Brian Sandoval, Attorney General Katherine Cortez Masto, Secretary of State Ross Miller, DAG William Geddes, DAG Kara Krause in Carson City, NV for Breach of Settlement Agreement. Trial is set for next April 2015.

Brown states that because of their refusal to as she has requested of them she has been prevented from seeking a Posthumous Pardon for Mr. Nolan Klein because the documents that were disseminated by the NDOC to the 2007 Parole Board and 2008 Pardons Board still  contain the  information pertaining to Mr. Klein and Ms. Brown.
Some of this false information was a direct result of a June 5, 2007 computer glitch that “FLIPPED” when the NOTIS software program was installed at the NDOC, thereby,  placing false felony charges in inmates files making it appear as though they have committed new crimes.
This information was then submitted to the 2007 Parole Board at which time Mr. Klein was appearing before them.  Mr. Klein then was denied his parole to the street in February 2008 and his previous granted paroles were revoked and he was placed back onto his first life sentence.
The following year, Mr. Klein appeared before the Nevada Pardons Board on a Compassionate Release Pardon because he was dying.  The Nevada Pardons Board consisted of the Nevada Supreme Court Justices, Attorney General Katherine Cortez Masto, and Governor James Gibbons. The Pardons Board were given a copy of the interview of Washoe County District Attorney Richard Gammick publicly admitting that he opened up Mr. Klein’s DNA and tested it. Mr. Klein’s attorney’s demanded to know where the test results were.
 The Nevada Pardons denied Mr. Klein a Compassionate Pardon and Mr. Klein died on September 20,2009.  At the time of Mr. Klein’s death his attorney’s were about to file their Motions for New Trial based on Newly Discovered evidence, and bail.  Mr. Klein’s criminal case was still pending on Appeal in the 9th Circuit.  Once Mr. Klein died everything became Moot!
Ms  Brown said “although Nolan is gone he is not forgotten.”   “The day he is given a Posthumous Pardon and Washoe County is held responsible for their actions will be the day I will let this go”
” the truth will be told in the upcoming release of her book “To Prove His Innocence  A Sister’s Love”

Ross Miller vs Adam Laxalt face off in Nevada AG debate

Ross Miller kicks ass

Ross Miller

NORTH LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP) — Secretary of State  touted his work enforcing Nevada’s election law while his opponent Adam Laxalt pointed to his legal experience in the military in a debate over who should be Nevada’s next attorney general.

Democrat Miller and Republican Laxalt squared off Saturday morning at the annual Nevada Press Association convention in North Las Vegas, fielding questions about public records, sparring about the ethics of politicians accepting gifts and comparing resumes.

Adam Laxalt

Adam Laxalt

“My broad range of legal experience makes me most qualified for this job,” said Laxalt, 36, a first-time candidate who worked as a private attorney in Las Vegas for three years and previously served as a judge advocate general in the U.S. Navy.

“I have experience solving real problems,” said Miller, 38, pointing to his work as a prosecutor in the Clark County District Attorney’s Office and noting that he investigated even organizations friendly to his party during his two terms as secretary of state.

The forum, held before Nevada journalists and moderated by Las Vegas Review-Journal columnist Steve Sebelius, focused largely on how the attorney general would enforce public records laws. Miller cited examples from his work in campaign finance disclosure as secretary of state, while Laxalt spoke broadly in favor of transparency but acknowledged he was unfamiliar with some of the finer points of open meeting and public records laws.

Attorney General candidate Ross Miller (D) made it clear where he stands on equal treatment under the law.

Asked whether there should be a cap on the fees public agencies can charge to pull up public records, Miller pointed out that there’s a real cost to assigning staff members to the task and processing documents.

“We’ve absolutely got to set a rate that’s reasonable,” Miller said. “We don’t want a standard in place that allows people to shut down government … It’s got to be reasonable, and there’s got to be balance.”

Laxalt said he believed transparency is essential and said he was willing to “roll up his sleeves” and work on the issue just like he’d done in the military, but he also said he didn’t know what would constitute a reasonable fee.

The two sparred about politicians accepting gifts, an issue prominent in attack ads run against Miller. Laxalt criticized Miller for taking more than $70,000 in gifts over a five-year period and vowed he would not accept any.

“My opponent has shown what I believe is a reckless habit of taking gifts,” Laxalt said. “I think it makes people wonder if their government works for them or for special interests.”

Miller shot back, saying many of the gifts he accepted were scholarships for educational seminars that have made him a stronger leader. He added that he’s disclosed more information than most politicians would because he’s a champion of transparency and wants voters to make their own judgments about the individual gifts.

“The entire reason that’s out there is I went above and beyond to put that out there,” Miller said. He also challenged Laxalt to disclose more records from his personnel file.

“We don’t know who he is or what he stands for,” Miller said.

The personnel file became an issue this summer when an unflattering job performance review from a Las Vegas law firm was leaked to the press.

The candidates also fielded questions about whether they’d defend Nevada laws that they might disagree with. It stemmed from an instance in which Nevada Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto declined to sue over President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, in spite of then-Gov. Jim Gibbons’ request.

Laxalt said he couldn’t foresee a situation in which he’d decline to follow a lawsuit that the governor requested.

“The last thing I want to do is to send a message that I wouldn’t enforce laws,” Laxalt said. But “If it was something that I felt was somehow unconstitutional, I’d have to very much evaluate that.”

Miller said it was hard to say what he would have done in the same situation, but said he would decline to sue “only in the rarest of circumstances.”

“You can certainly envision statues in place that would be clearly unconstitutional and based on those, I wouldn’t defend those,” Miller said, giving examples of laws requiring people to wear a Star of David or reinstituting slavery. “The attorney general is the state’s top attorney. That individual has to be a true leader.”

source: http://www.rgj.com/story/news/politics/2014/09/20/miller-laxalt-face-nevada-ag-debate/15965793/

Adam Laxalt for Nevada Attorney General

http://www.adamlaxaltforag.com/

Meet Democratic Rising Star, Ross Miller, Nevada’s Secretary of State Fox & Friends 9 20 13

Ross Miller – 2014 AG Race, The Trailer

Hypothetically speaking, Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval easily could beat U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., in a head-to-head Senate matchup in the 2016 election.

brian-sandoval-bongHypothetically speaking, Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval easily could beat U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., in a head-to-head Senate matchup in the 2016 election.

That’s according to an automatic telephone poll taken last week by Harper Polling, a GOP firm led by Brock McCleary.

The survey found Sandoval leading Reid with 53 percent support from likely Nevada voters compared to 43 percent for the senator. Sandoval does especially well among independent voters, 65 percent to 28 percent.

At this point, so far out from Reid’s re-election and with Sandoval expressing no public interest in running for the U.S. Senate, the poll is essentially a popularity contest. And Sandoval is popular, while Reid is not.

Reid got a favorable rating from 41 percent of those polled and unfavorable from 55 percent, with 4 percent not sure.

Sandoval had a favorable rating of 58 percent and an unfavorable score of 30 percent, with 12 percent not sure.

Reid, a divisive and powerful figure in Nevada and Washington as Senate majority leader, has long had a poor rating among voters. But that didn’t stop him from winning re-election in 2010 against tea party Republican Sharron Angle. Most public polls showed Reid losing, but his internal surveys showed him winning, which he did by nearly 6 percentage points.

Reaction to the poll was interesting.

Asked by reporters in Washington about the poll results, Reid quipped, “Just record the smile on my face.”

Reid told a Politico reporter he thought Sandoval would be even further ahead because he spends most his time in Nevada.

“I thought he would be up by more,” Reid said Friday afternoon as he left the Capitol, according to Politico. “He’s out there every day. I’m back here slogging it out. I was surprised it was so close. Really!”

U.S. Sen, Dean Heller, R-Nev., a close Sandoval friend, said he was encouraging the governor to consider running for the Senate.

“I know he won’t take a look at it until after the governor’s race is over,” Heller said. “He will have an important decision to make this winter.”

Heller said he was surprised by Sandoval’s margin over Reid.

“Personally, I would have seen Sandoval up 15 to 20 (percentage points),” Heller said, smiling. “If you told me 10, that’s the only surprise I get out of it.”

Sandoval’s campaign manager, Jeremy Hughes, echoed his boss’ sentiments on a potential Senate race.

“Governor Sandoval loves his job, and he is focused on working for the people of Nevada,” Hughes said.

Sandoval is expected to win re-election easily Nov. 4, facing a little-known Democrat, Bob Goodman, who wasn’t recruited by the Democratic Party, which failed to find a formidable opponent.

According to the Harper poll, Sandoval would win re-election with 56 percent support to 34 percent for Goodman. Another 10 percent said they weren’t sure.

Pollster McCleary said Nevada’s first Hispanic governor leads among Latino voters, 54-39, while Goodman “suffers from low name identification” with only 38 percent of voters having heard of him. In the June 10 Democratic primary, Goodman finished second behind “none of these candidates.”

As a result, Goodman received only 60 percent of the vote among Democrats whereas Sandoval garnered 84 percent of the Republican vote. In the June 10 GOP primary, Sandoval won with nearly 90 percent of the Republican vote.

The survey of 602 likely Nevada voters was taken July 26-29 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points. The party breakdown was 37 percent Republican, 43 percent Democrat and 20 percent nonpartisan, which roughly matches the statewide breakdown in Nevada.

— Laura Myers and Steve Tetreault

A DIFFERENT KIND OF CAMPAIGN AD

Ross Miller kicks assRoss Miller “is ready for the fight.”

That’s the main message of Miller’s unique movie-trailer-like ad that he debuted at the Las Vegas Film Festival last week as part of the Democrat’s campaign for Nevada attorney general against Republican Adam Laxalt.

The 46-second spot, which also is running online, is backed by a loud local rock band, Otherwise, playing “Soldiers.”

“This November, you will choose Nevada’s chief law enforcement officer,” the ad text says between dramatic camera shots of airplane flyovers of Nevada’s rugged, desert mountains.

Miller, the secretary of state and former Clark County prosecutor, also is pictured standing next to cops at a crime scene and in the courtroom, holding a handgun in an evidence baggie in one shot.

An athlete, Miller also is seen bare-chested with his fists up during a UFC mixed martial arts fight.

“The only candidate who has enforced Nevada law,” the ad reads, noting he’s been endorsed by cops and prosecutors.

Miller said he liked the idea of putting together a different sort of ad that might attract voters’ attention.

“I am always looking to try to find creative and fun ways to reach out to voters about my record and prosecutorial experience,” Miller said in a statement. “If I can do that while supporting the Nevada entrepreneurial spirit that created the film festival — even better.”

The video can be seen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sG5mEfiq3

KE&feature=youtu.be

— Laura Myers

ROMNEY BACKS LAXALT

While Miller was touting what his campaign called a “blockbuster election,” Laxalt was picking up another big-name endorsement, this one from former GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney.

Romney, a popular figure among Nevada Republicans, won the GOP presidential caucuses here in 2008 and 2012, although he went on to lose the 2012 election to President Barack Obama.

Romney praised Laxalt’s military service, including in Iraq where the attorney handled detention and prosecution of terrorist suspects.

“Nevadans have a great opportunity to elect a bright, experienced and qualified lawyer as their next attorney general,” Romney said in a statement. “Adam Laxalt is a veteran of the U.S. Navy and served in a critically-important capacity as a JAG officer in Iraq, helping put away some of the world’s most dangerous people.

“He has been a leader in our military, and he will be a great leader for Nevada.”

Laxalt, in turn, praised Romney’s business experience and service as the former governor of Massachusetts.

“He has had enormous success in both the public and private sectors, and he is a wonderful family man,” Laxalt said. “I was proud to have supported Mitt Romney in his campaign for president, and I am humbled to have earned his support today.”

— Laura Myers

Ray Hagar: Adam Laxalt is a fresh and believable candidate in Nevada politics, yet new to the political wars of Nevada but Ross Miller can KICK HIS ASS!

Adam Laxalt

Adam Laxalt is a fresh and believable candidate in Nevada politics, yet new to the political wars of Nevada.

Adam Laxalt is a fresh and believable candidate in Nevada politics, yet new to the political wars of Nevada.

A first-time candidate at 35, Laxalt jumped into the race for attorney general when no other significant Republican would step up. You have to admire his courage, even his rookie enthusiasm.

He was sought after by Republicans partly because of his family name. He is, of course, the grandson of former U.S. Sen. and Gov. Paul Laxalt, who was so influential in 1980s Washington politics that he was called the “first friend” to President Ronald Reagan.

Laxalt has a lot going for him, politically. He’s a former Navy JAG officer who volunteered for the battle zones of Iraq. He has a wife and child straight out of central casting. Plus he’s got that royal name.

The thought here, however, is that it’s too much for Laxalt to be expected to defeat Democrat Ross Miller for attorney general this year.

Ross Miller kicks ass

Ross Miller kicks ass

Miller has been campaigning for attorney general for more than a year. Some say he’s been game-planning this race since he was re-elected as secretary of state in 2010.

He’s raised almost $1.4 million and has his own royal bloodline since his dad, Bob Miller, served 10 years as Nevada’s governor.

Like Paul Laxalt, Bob has friends in high places. Bill Clinton comes to mind. The former president wrote the foreword to Bob’s recent autobiography, “Son of a Gambling Man.”

The venerable and respected retired Sen. Paul Laxalt, 91, is perhaps too elderly to help his grandson’s campaign much. But that is not the case with Bob Miller, who’s still strong enough to arm wrestle you for a donation to his son’s campaign.

Nevada Secretary Of State Ross Miller Wins MMA Fight
Yes that’s really the Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller winning his first — and last amateur MMA bout.
The 36-year-old Miller has been in office since 2005.

More importantly, Nevada Democrats have a voter registration advantage over Republicans of almost 112,000.

Many are counting on a Republican upswing in 2014. It remains to be seen if that carries the day in the AG’s race.

IF ADAM LAXALT could turn back time, it might have been better for him to start his political career in Carson City and not Las Vegas, where he lives now.

http://www.adamlaxaltforag.com

Carson City is his grandfather’s hometown. Paul Laxalt played on Carson High School’s 1938 state championship basketball team. That’s how far back the family legacy goes.

The Laxalt name remains huge in Carson City. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Warren Lerude recently finished a book on Laxalt’s brother, Robert Laxalt, perhaps Nevada’s greatest author.

The state capital would certainly have embraced the homecoming of Paul Laxalt’s grandson. Maybe the smarter move for Adam Laxalt would have been to start his political career in Assembly District 40, representing his grandpa’s hometown.

Who wouldn’t vote for a Laxalt in that district? This year especially, Laxalt could have waltzed into Carson City’s open seat in Assembly District 40 and begun plotting his ascension to Congress.

With some legislative experience, Laxalt would be a better and more seasoned candidate for attorney general — or any other office — on his way to the top.

He certainly would be setting himself up to succeed Rep. Mark Amodei, R-Carson City, or beat him in a future primary. Amodei’s 2nd U.S. House District would be a good fit for Laxalt. Its residents respect military service and Nevada history.

As a congressman, Laxalt’s close ties to his grandfather and mother’s friends in Washington, D.C., could be put to use for Nevada voters, since we are talking about A-List Beltway Republicans.

Maybe Laxalt has the potential to become a statesman, like his grandfather. But he has to win an election first.

The hope here is that Adam Laxalt didn’t get suckered into an attorney general’s race he can’t win — one that may end his political career before it gets started.

Continue reading

IS NEVADA SECRETARY OF STATE’S DONOR DISCLOSURE CAMPAIGN BLIND TO THE LEFT?

shutterstock_24902143

A U.S. Senate subcommittee voted along party lines Wednesday to approve a constitutional amendment restricting the First Amendment’s guarantee of freedom of speech. Led by Nevada’s own Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, elected Democrats have for the last few years engaged in a widespread effort to restrict the speech of their opponents. And Nevada is no exception.

While railing against the influence of right-leaning billionaires, Reid used the floor of the United States Senate to hold the equivalent of an all-night telethon to solicit donations from a left-wing billionaire for his Democratic Senate colleagues.

In Wisconsin Democratic prosecutors have harassed conservative politicians and activists in so-called “John Doe” cases.

Here in the Silver State, Secretary of State Ross Miller has waged an all-out campaign to force disclosure by organizations engaging in political activity. Well, maybe not all out.

Former Las Vegas Sun reporter Andrew Doughman reported in January on Miller’s efforts toforce organizations to disclose their donors, noting three such lawsuits the Democrat Miller had filed.

• In July 2012, conservative group Citizen Outreach was fined for failing to file expense reports showing how the organization paid for mailers criticizing former Assemblyman John Oceguera, D-Las Vegas, during his 2010 re-election campaign. Citizen Outreach has appealed the decision.

• In November 2012, the Nevada branch of national conservative group Americans for Prosperity won a lawsuit about whether the group had to disclose donor contribution reports for a negative mailer it published about state Sen. Kelvin Atkinson, D-North Las Vegas. Miller is not appealing that decision.

• Also in November, a judge fined Virginia-based Alliance for America’s Future for running an advertisement in favor of Gov. Brian Sandoval in the 2010 election. The group did not register as a political action committee in Nevada, and the courts have said the group will now have to disclose who paid for the advertisement. The alliance has appealed the decision to the state Supreme Court.

Since that article was published another organization has become a target of Miller.

After a group known as the State Government Leadership Foundation ran a 30-second television ad critical of Miller, who is now running for Attorney General, he responded byvowing to “continue to review every legal option to compel this front group to reveal its special interest donors”.

A few days later a former deputy of Miller’s filed a complaint against SGLF, “seeking financial penalties and an injunction to halt the ad campaign” and claiming the group should have registered with the Secretary of State’s office and disclose its donors.

The Secretary of State’s office is no longer involved with this particular complaint. According to Public Information Officer Catherin Lu, the Secretary of State’s office received the complaint “and immediately deferred to the Nevada Attorney General’s office for review independent of this office.”

While Doughman states the situation is “not a partisan issue”, all of these lawsuits have targeted right-leaning groups. According to Lu, the only other similar case the Secretary of State’s office has pursued was against Joe Scala, owner of Courtesy Automotive, for actions Scala took during a recall effort of Las Vegas City Councilman Steve Ross, a Democrat.

Yet the behavior that should trigger the lawsuits, according to the sections of Nevada law Miller is claiming to be enforcing, is hardly limited to the right.

NRS 294A.140 requires essentially any group that receives more than $1,000 in contributions or “makes an expenditure for or against a candidate for office or a group of such candidates” to disclose its donors. NRS 294A.210 has similar provisions but applies to groups that expend more than $1,000 advocating for or against candidates.

As Doughman’s piece reveals,

“Our donations are confidential,” wrote Erin Neff, former executive director of ProgressNow Nevada Action, in an April 27, 2012, fundraising email appealing to Nevadans to donate to a campaign for state Sen. Pat Spearman, D-Las Vegas. “As a 501(c)(4), ProgressNow Nevada Action does not publicly report its donors.”

ProgressNow Nevada Action’s 990 filings indicate the group raised $355,047 in 2011 and $67,531 in 2012, far exceeding the limit NRS294A.140 sets for requiring disclosure. A search for the group on the Secretary of State’s campaign finance disclosure websiteindicates ProgressNow Nevada Action has not disclosed its donors.

In addition to the fundraising email for Spearman, the group also published a voter guide in 2012. While the guide is no longer available online, the website of the late Assemblywoman Peggy Pierce, who served in the Legislature through 2013 but passed away shortly after that session, contains the group’s candidate profile of Pierce.

“We can’t fathom why Peggy Pierce draws primaries. She’s a true progressive by any count and is one of the most reliable go-to legislators for progressive issues, ideas and bills.

“If it protects consumers; makes our tax system fair; raises revenue for schools or protects the environment, it’s likely a Peggy Pierce bill.”

If urging voters to call a candidate about an issue, the offense allegedly committed by AFP, is considered “express advocacy”, then certainly such fawning praise as was heaped upon the late Assemblywoman Pierce should meet the same definition. According to Lu, “[a]ny form of communication can be express advocacy,” including website content and, presumably, emails.

“Depending on content on website, it could be express advocacy which would trigger disclosure requirements of NRS 294A.348, contributions & expenses reporting requirements of NRS 294A.140/294A.210 (i.e., reporting all contributors who gave in excess of $1000), and it could require the organization to register as a PAC (NRS 294A.0055),” Lu wrote in an email. “Again, we evaluate the facts of each situation on a case-by-case basis.”

Yet it appears only right-leaning groups have been the object of Miller’s gaze.

This was not always the case. In 2009 Miller’s investigation of ACORN resulted in 13-count indictments against ACORN and its former Las Vegas leader. It was the only case in the nation in which the organization itself was charged with a felony.

But in the case of campaign disclosure, as with his Democrat colleagues across the country, it appears Miller is blind to the left.

Michael Chamberlain

Michael Chamberlain is the Editor of Watchdog Wire – Nevada. Please contact him at Nevada@watchdogwire.com for story ideas or to get involved in citizen journalism in Nevada. Follow Michael on Twitter: @michaelpchamber

RELATED ARTICLES

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source: http://watchdogwire.com/nevada/2014/06/19/is-nevada-secretary-of-states-donor-disclosure-campaign-blind-to-the-left/

The mistress of Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller, boasted about her lurid affair with a “man in politics” just a few months after he came to power, it emerged today

Image

Ross Miller explains his penis size.

The mistress of Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller, boasted about her lurid affair with a “man in politics” just a few months after he came to power, it emerged today.

Revelations about the 31-year-old, whose name we are keeping private in exchange for this interview, had a relationship with the handsome Democrat, who turned 38 this year, emerged as she remained in hiding.

It has now been about a week since the usually outgoing young lady has disappeared from public view.

 

It is thought that her love rival, Lesley Miller, the Nevada Secretary of State’s wife, meanwhile remains unaware about Secretary Miller’s cheating scandal. Despite Mr Miller’s insistence to his staff that the scandal is a “private matter” which should be kept “secret”, his mistress has been photographed and published in more than a handful of well-known fashion magazines.

 

 In one of the publications she is quoted as telling a friend “more than a year ago” that she has found a “nice-looking man, very different from earlier boyfriends, who is in politics.”

This raises the prospect that Secretary Miller, who is attempting to run for the Nevada State Attorney General’s Office, started the affair within a few months of being sworn in as Secretary of State. He is not eligible to run for a third term for Secretary due to term limits.

We are warning you now, this paragraph is a bit graphic; so do not read this if you are of a sensitive nature. “I used to travel with him on official business, often taking a different flight to enhance the secrecy,” his mistress reported. “Believe me,” she insisted, “the affair was full aflame. Okay, let me tell you this, I’m now speaking to Mrs. Miller when I say this because only she, and whoever else he did this with, would know. Rossy” (a name she calls him) “has a small mole near his groin area. When he is reaching the moment of truth he makes this very distinct ‘oh, oh, oh’ sound that I have never heard another man make.”

“There is no worse sickness than indifference,” she said shaking her head. She suggested that Mr. Miller likes to make a name for himself politically, by filing trumped up charges against innocent people, to use in his next campaign. She also made it clear that Mr. Miller had been distracted with his relationship with her for quite some time.

The affair would continue when she would sneak off in her car to meet up with him for trysts in local hotel rooms. Miller would “wear a baseball hat pulled down to just above his eyebrows and would wear a high-collared shirt covering his chin,” she reported.

Ross James Miller, born in Las Vegas, Nevada, is the son of former Nevada Governor from 1989 to 1999, Bob Miller. “I know this coming out now is going to hurt his run for Nevada Attorney General, but I just couldn’t keep it in any longer,” she said as a tear ran slowly down her cheek.

In words that may be considered extremely cruel by both women, Mr. Miller even confided in a friend that if he was eventually elected governor, one of his ultimate goals, that his spouse at the time would have “no official status.” He was committed to keeping the costs down by whoever was confirmed as Nevada’s first lady.

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Miller has raised $1.25 million for AG campaign compared to Laxalt’s $543,000

Miller has raised $1.25 million for AG campaign compared to Laxalt’s $543,000

In the competitive Nevada attorney general’s race, Democrat Ross Miller has raised more than $1.25 million so far compared to $543,000 raised by Republican Adam Laxalt, their campaigns said Monday.

Miller reported having about $700,000 in cash on hand while Laxalt reported $440,000 in cash as the two stockpile money for their coming Nov. 4 general election since neither has a June 10 primary opponnet.

Laxalt, the grandson of former U.S. Sen. Paul Laxalt, had an impressive 2014 fundraising period. He raised all of his money from January through May 16, the end of the reporting period, thanks to big-name donors such as Donald Rumsfeld, the former Secretary of Defense; Ed Rollins, who ran President Ronald Reagan’s campaign; and GOP Gov. Brian Sandoval.

During the same time period this year, Miller raised $255,000, according to his latest report. Last year, however, the secretary of state and son of former Gov. Bob Miller, raised about $880,000 as he got a head-start in the contest.

Laxalt said he met his fundraising goals.

“I am truly humbled by the outpouring (of) support from so many people across Nevada and throughout the country,” Laxalt said in a statement. “In just a very short time since entering this race, we have reached our initial fundraising goals and strongly exceeded some early expectations of our campaign.”

“We are in the middle of a Reaganesque revolution brought on by the most overreaching administration since Jimmy Carter,” he added. “I am happy to give a voice to those who are deeply concerned about the direction we are headed.”

Miller, too, expressed gratitude and noted he had the support of local prosecutors and police.

“I am humbled by the overwhelming support from Nevadans for our campaign,” Miller said in a statement. “Everyday we are building a campaign that is bringing a variety of stakeholders from across Nevada together – including prosecutors and police officers.”

More than half of the more than 600 donors to Laxalt were Nevadans, according to his campaign.

Miller’s campaign said that 93 percent of his donations came from Nevada.

Big name Nevada donors to Laxalt included Frank Fahrenkopf, former president of the American Gaming Association and the Republican National Committee; Former Clark County Commission Chair Bruce Woodbury; U.S. Rep. Mark Amodei, R-Nev.; Las Vegas City Councilmen Bob Beers and Stavros Anthony; and gaming executives including Lee Amaitis of Cantor Gaming, Mike Leven of the Las Vegas Sands, Corp., Tim Poster and Bill Weidner. Sandoval donated to Laxalt via his New Nevada Political Action Committee.

Laxalt won support from national figures as well. Besides Rumsfeld and Rollins, he got donations from Reagan biographer Craig Shirley, investor T. Boone Pickens and Jim Nicholson, former RNC chairman and U.S. Veterans Affairs secretary.

Besides Laxalt and Miller, Jonathan Hansen of the Independent American Party also is running for attorney general.

Contact Laura Myers at lmyers@reviewjournal.com or 702-387-2919. Find her on Twitter: @lmyerslvrj.

Ross Miller’s House of Cards: Big money comes to state attorney general races

atlantic

Groups like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce are spending heavily nationwide to keep Democrats out of the powerful posts.

Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller, a candidate for state attorney general, of living a lavish lifestyle at the taxpayers’ expense.

MAY 8 2014, 6:00 AM ETTV ads are targeting Nevada candidate Ross Miller even though he’s running unopposed in a primary three months away. (Sandra Chereb/Associated Press)

The ads accuse Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller, a candidate for state attorney general, of living a lavish lifestyle at the taxpayers’ expense.

Shots of Miller with Mike Tyson and Hugh Hefner’s former girlfriend flash across the screen as the narrator highlights more than $60,000 in gifts Miller has accepted from “special interests” since taking office in 2006.

“He lives the life,” the narrator says. “You pay the tab.”

The $500,000 ad campaign is being paid for by a nonprofit from Virginia called the State Government Leadership Foundation. It’s an impressive sum, especially considering the ads ran three months before a primary in which Miller is running unopposed, and for an office that doesn’t normally get so much attention. Miller’s campaign called on TV stations to pull the ads, challenging them as misleading.

So why is so much money being poured into the race and who is behind it? The biggest underwriter of the group behind the ad is the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the affiliated Institute for Legal Reform, according to a Center for Public Integrity investigation.

Ross Miller’s House of Cards

The Chamber isn’t talking, but it’s not hard to figure out why state attorney-general races are getting so much of its attention, not just in Nevada, but across the country.

First, the joke is that “AG” stands for “almost governor” in the 43 states where they are elected, as many go on to higher elected office. Spending on these races is an investment in the future. Eight current governors and eight current U.S. senators were previously state attorneys general.

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Adam Laxalt to run for Nevada Attorney General against Ross Miller

Las Vegas attorney Adam Laxalt, the grandson of former Nevada governor and U.S. Sen. Paul Laxalt, R-Nev., plans to formally announce today that he’s running for attorney general.

The Republican will face Ross Miller, the Democratic secretary of state, in the Nov. 4 general election if the two men win their respective primaries. Miller is the son of Bob Miller, a former governor who served for 10 years until 1999.

See: http://www.adamlaxaltforag.com

Laxalt, 34, will make his announcement at the Reno Republican Men’s Club luncheon at the Atlantis hotel-casino. Former state Treasurer Patty Cafferata, his campaign co-chairwoman, will introduce him.

“The family — his and mine — go back a long way,” said Cafferata, the daughter of the late U.S. Rep. Barbara Vucanovich, R-Nev. “And so I’m excited for him and for the state.”

Carson City Republican Central Committee Candidate Forum February 27, 2014

Published on Mar 6, 2014

Candidates:
Carson City District Attorney: Mark Krueger & Jasson Woodbury (9:00)
State Treasurer: Dan Schwartz (28:25)
State Attorney General Adam Laxalt (19:00)
Carson City Sheriff: Kenny Furlong (43:30), Don Gibson (50:30) & Daniel Gonzales (54:00)

Cafferata said she didn’t know why he chose Reno to announce his candidacy, although Laxalt is more well-known in Southern Nevada and needs to raise his profile up north. Laxalt wanted to file his candidacy papers, too, but the filing period doesn’t open until March 3, running through March 14 for state and local candidates other than judicial.

After two terms as secretary of state, Miller, 37, has high-name recognition and has proved to be a strong fundraiser. He has collected about $900,000 for his campaign so far, according to a campaign finance report he plans to file this week. Many are small-time donors, who follow Miller on Twitter, where he has 16,566 followers, his campaign said.

Laxalt is a household name in Nevada politics, although the state’s new residents might not be as familiar with Paul Laxalt’s political legacy since he retired from the U.S. Senate in 1987 after two terms. He was Nevada governor from 1967 to 1971 and lieutenant governor from 1963 to 1967.

Adam Laxalt, who grew up with his mother, Michelle Laxalt, in the Washington, D.C. area, moved to Las Vegas a couple of years ago.

He made headlines last year when his mother and former U.S. Sen. Pete Dominici, R-N.M., revealed the senator was Adam Laxalt’s father — a secret his mother kept from her family, including her father, Paul Laxalt. Speculation at the time was that Dominici came forward because the news was about to be revealed, but it also could have paved the way for the younger Laxalt to run for political office without having to deal with an old scandal.

Campaigning as an underdog, Adam Laxalt is expected to get robust backing from many of Nevada’s leading Republicans, including Gov. Brian Sandoval, who has endorsed a string of strong statewide candidates to bolster the entire GOP ticket. The Nevada Republican Party had circulated a petition urging Laxalt to run as well.

But some Republicans, including six members of the Laxalt family, already endorsed or contributed to Miller, a moderate who has crossover appeal because of his actions in office and his father’s bipartisan legacy.

Neena Laxalt, who is Adam Laxalt’s aunt and Paul Laxalt’s daughter, is a Republican but has endorsed Miller.

“I will continue to endorse Ross,” Neena Laxalt said Monday in an interview. “I put my name with Ross a long time ago, and I’m proud to be supporting him. I think he is more competent, more than capable and more than qualified.”

Miller’s campaign manager Jim Ferrence said the popular Democrat has gained a lot of GOP and independent support. As for the battle between two political families, Ferrence said Miller is prepared for a high-profile race.

“We’ve been counting on a vigorous campaign no matter who got into the race,” Ferrence said. “Ross is looking forward to the debate process, not only on the issues, but on their experience.”

Miller was a deputy district attorney before he ran for secretary of state the first time in 2006.

Laxalt is a litigation and government affairs attorney in private practice with Lewis and Roca LLP. Previously, Laxalt was a lieutenant judge advocate in the general corps of the U.S. Navy from August 2005 until August 2011, according to his resume.

Eric Herzik, a political science professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, said the attorney general’s race should attract more attention from voters because the two men running come from famous political families.

“However, I think it’s still an uphill climb against Ross Miller,” Herzik said of Laxalt’s chances. “He’s well-established, has showed some crossover appeal, and he’s got plenty of money. And Laxalt really isn’t a known commodity.”

In his favor, Herzik said Laxalt doesn’t appear to have political baggage that can weigh down a candidate.

Thus he may appeal to both establishment Republicans who remember his grandfather and tea party types who want smaller government and less federal spending.

See: http://www.adamlaxaltforag.com

source: http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/adam-laxalt-run-attorney-general-against-ross-miller

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LV SUN: A Scandal to hang Governor Brian Sandoval’s neck on

Las Vegas Sun Brian Sandoval Security beefed up

governor sandovalBy   Friday, July 12, 2013 | 2 a.m.

When the Sacramento Bee uncovered the practice of the state-run mental hospital in Las Vegas busing some of its discharged patients out of Nevada with little more than a bottle of Ensure, Nevada Democrats knew they had the kernel of a scandal to hang around the popular governor’s neck.

The news releases started almost immediately.

They only intensified as Gov. Brian Sandoval initially avoided questions about the practice as the Bee stepped up its coverage.

“The fact that it took weeks of devastating coverage in the media to force Gov. Sandoval to make this policy change shows just how morally bankrupt this administration is,” one news release blared in April.

Since then, the news releases haven’t stopped accusing Sandoval of reacting too slowly to the situation and stonewalling the press.

But as the well-liked governor heads into what is shaping up to be an easy re-election bid, some are wondering to what end the Democrats are ramping up their attack machine against Sandoval.

Governor Brian Sandoval State of CORRUPTION

GoverNOT  Brian Sandoval State of CORRUPTION

The party so far has been unable to put forward a solid candidate to run against Sandoval. So if Democrats aren’t attacking the governor in the hopes of installing their own candidates in Carson City, what’s the point?

“As much as you can soften him up and break his bank account, you want to do that,” one Democratic operative said.

In other words, the attacks against Sandoval aren’t so much geared toward winning the governor’s race, but keeping him busy defending himself so he can be less of an asset to down-ticket Republicans.

The Sandoval campaign appeared nonplussed.

“We haven’t really noticed any attacks,” Sandoval’s political consultant Mike Slanker said. “Not sure what they might be softening.”

Still, Slanker added, Sandoval isn’t about to simply coast through the 2014 election.

I had the pleasure of interviewing, and grilling 2014 Governor David Lory VanDerBeek on my radio show, and since it was in originally in 2 segments I have posted the interview here in full! Let me know if you agree with his views, and what you think. Otherwise enjoy!
Miss Tila Tequila

“The governor is fully committed to re-election and to fighting for wins up and down the ticket,” Slanker said. “He is fully engaged.”

Catherine Cortez Masto, next Nevada Governor?

Catherine Cortez Masto, next Nevada Governor?

The Democratic Party insists that the steady barrage of attacks on the patient busing practice is just the beginning of a sustained effort to drive up Sandoval’s negatives regardless of whether he draws an opponent.

And that’s not exactly an easy proposition. Even Democrats exhibit some awe of Sandoval’s ability to stay relentlessly on message, avoid major missteps and generally remain scandal free.

But Democrats see a few vulnerabilities. Most recently, Sandoval vetoed a bill that would have required private-party background checks, an issue that polls find is popular with Nevadans. The move likely won’t hurt him with Republicans, but could hurt him with key swing voters such as soccer moms, Democratic operatives posit.

Democrats also may turn to the first budget Sandoval put forward in 2011, when Nevada was still firmly in the grip of the recession.

Sandoval had promised not to raise taxes or extend temporary taxes and put forward a budget that could have hamstrung the higher education system.

Sandoval finally backed down when a Nevada Supreme Court decision eliminated his ability to pad the state budget with local money and let the temporary taxes continue.

Ross Miller Nevada is corrupt

Ross Miller for Governor Nevada ?

“Brian Sandoval will have to explain next year why the only things he has to show for his four years as governor are a patient dumping scandal, Nevada remaining dead last in education, and why we continue to lead the nation in unemployment and foreclosure rates,” Democrats’ spokesman Zach Hudson said. “Nevada’s middle class is suffering under Brian Sandoval’s leadership, and we will spend the next year and a half reminding voters how out of touch the governor is with Nevada families.”

Republicans don’t seem too concerned with the effort, particularly because Democrats don’t have a candidate to deliver the attacks.

“I’ve never seen one of these efforts succeed. A party attacking a candidate without an alternative is a waste of money,” one Republican operative said. “You have to be a credible messenger to land a credible attack and make it stick. Parties are not a credible messenger.”

Brian Sandoval with his bong

Nevada governor Brian Sandoval burns a bowl after signing medical pot into law.

While the election is still 17 months away, time is short in political parlance. Typically, candidates begin preparing to launch a major campaign at least two years ahead of time.

That’s not to say, however, that it’s too late for Democrats to come up with a messenger.

Clark County Commissioner Steve Sisolak has long been open about his ambition to be governor. He has not yet formally announced, but is in the process of putting together a poll to assess his chances should he enter the race.

And that has many Democrats salivating.

Sisolak has never been shy of emptying the arsenal of negative attacks on a political opponent. And he has the fundraising chops and enough of his own wealth to at least put a tarnish on Sandoval’s shine.

But if Democrats hope Sisolak will get in the race simply to ensure Sandoval doesn’t have a free ride, they’ve got another hope coming.

“I am not getting into the race, as I have said before, to be a steve_sisolak_mugsacrificial-lamb type of candidate,” Sisolak told the Reno Gazette-Journal this month. “Unless I thought that there would be a path to victory, I wouldn’t be running. … We will just have to wait and see.”

Nev. secretary of state Ross Miller accused of CORRUPTION & disclosure violation

Ross Miller Nevada is corrupt

Ross Miller Nevada is corrupt

A national Republican group has sued Democratic Nevada Secretary of State Ross Miller, saying he failed to turn over records that should be made public detailing his travel, compensation, public schedule and cellphone use. Continue reading

We’re in the mix for $115,000.00 dollars in the Alex Jones InfoWAR “Operation Paul Revere”

alex jones paul rev

Online Virtual Film Festival

Three (3) Cash Prizes will be awarded:
Grand Prize – $100,000 cash
Second Place – $10,000 cash
Third Place – $5,000 cash

We can mix a video and tell our stories of how we’re using the Internet to expand out on-the-street protests against local and State corruption here in Nevada and California. The protests serve as a beacon and are “eye candy” to passers by.  The massive signs and CRIME SCENE banner  bring light to the issues and can’t be ignored when driving by the State Capital or the Reno and Carson City courthouses.

A protest comes and goes, but a “movement” stays and grows.”

We have a catalog of videos and documentaries and we’ll enter a mash-up including some new stuff and a very special surprise, a custom InfoWAR banner for Alex Jones and his crew for the Bilderberg meeting demonstrations. Here is some of out work and we’ll post out contest entries here very soon. Continue reading

Lake Tahoe News covers Justin Brothers Bail Bonds / Doug Lewis criminal charges

LTnews

Carson City bounty hunter Doug Lewis faces charges in S. Tahoe

On: March 13, 2013,  By: admin, In: News3 Comments


Doug Lewis Nevada Bounty Hunter with Justin Brothers Bail Bonds

Doug Lewis Nevada Bounty Hunter with Justin Brothers Bail Bonds

Five misdemeanor charges have been filed against a Carson City bounty hunter in regards to his actions in South Lake Tahoe.

Douglas Lewis with Justin Brothers Bail Bonds has been charged with unlawful arrest, aggravated trespass, vandalism, battery and damaging a vehicle.

The incident occurred in October at the South Lake Tahoe home of Ty Robben. Robben wanted felony charges filed against the suspect. He said the bounty hunters broke down his door and used a Taser on him.

Robben has since filed a civil suit against the Carson City firm and has protested the Justin Brothers with the large crime scene tape. “Protesting will continue against the Justin Bros for the duration” Robben said.

It was the delay in action that led Robben in January to protest near the South Lake Tahoe Police Department.

Doug Lewis starred in a TV show called Bounty Hunter watch it here: http://youtu.be/dckPsFvYrdc?t=7m48s

Doug Lewis is also doing business on a permanently revoked Nevada business license according to the Nevada Secretary of State website http://nvsos.gov/SOSEntitySearch/corpsearch.aspx?st=c&ss=nevada%20bail%20enforcement

– Lake Tahoe News staff report

Justin Brothers Bail Bonds

Justin Brothers Bail Bonds Carson City charged with criminal activity in bounty hunter case gone bad