TOP SECRET! FED SPIES REFUSE TO RELEASE OSAMA BIN LADEN’S SICKO PORN STASH Government bureaucrats say they won’t be releasing this historically important treasure trove of smut

TOP SECRET! Fed Spies Refuse To Release Osama Bin Laden’s SICKO PORN STASH

by ERIC OWENS | DAILY CALLER | MAY 23, 2015

On Wednesday, the U.S. Office of the Director of National Intelligence released a slew of documents relating to the 2011 raid that killed Osama Bin Laden. Among much else, the documents revealed that Noam Chomsky, 9/11 conspiracy nuts and some guy who claims to have traced the ancestral lineage of the Illuminati were among the authors gracing Bin Laden’s English-language book collection.

The al-Qaida boss also kept plenty of pornography on hand for his viewing pleasure while he was holed up in Pakistan. However, government bureaucrats say they won’t be releasing this historically important treasure trove of smut.

“We have no plans to release that at this point in time,” National Intelligence spokesman Brian Hale said,according to The Washington Post. “Due to the nature of the content, the decision was made not to release it.”

Since bin Laden’s death in 2011, unconfirmed reports have circulated that he kept an impressive array of pornographic material for those times when he couldn’t or did not want to be with any of his four wives.

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Will Las Vegas porn stars be required to wear condoms like brothel workers?

condomBy Andrea Domanick (contact)
Friday, Jan. 23, 2015 | 2 a.m.

2015 AVN/AEE: Day 1
Day 1 of the 2015 AVN/Adult Entertainment Expo on Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015, at the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas. Launch slideshow »
The Adult Video News Awards and Entertainment Expo is back in Las Vegas this week, and with more than 30,000 attendees and 180 exhibitors, the X-rated event is enjoying its largest turnout in years. But news that a condom mandate for adult entertainers could come to Southern Nevada has people concerned the region’s potential porn boom might be over before it begins.
After reports surfaced late last year that two male performers contracted HIV during an adult film shoot in Nevada, state health officials are considering tighter safety regulations on porn sets, including requiring condoms.

A similar mandate in Los Angeles County a few years back compelled some adult film companies to move production elsewhere. A growing number in the $6 billion industry are choosing Las Vegas. The city’s appeal has only increased after an appeals court upheld the Los Angeles ordinance in December.

Nevada Department of Health and Human Services and state Occupational Safety and Health Administration officials now are considering adopting regulations for the adult film industry similar to those used in Nevada’s legal brothels, including condom use and regular testing. There has never been a reported transmission of HIV in a Nevada brothel.

Other potential options include mandatory testing for sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV, and requiring permits for adult filming. Unlike Los Angeles County, which closely tracks and regulates shoots, Nevada requires no permits or notification for filming on private property.

“{There’s) no timeline at this point,” Department of Health and Human Services spokeswoman Mary Woods said. “Regulations can take up to two years but ideally less than that. Any regulation will require a series of public workshops and enough time to allow and incorporate feedback.”

People in porn say comparing movie production to brothels isn’t fair.

“It’s not the same,” said Michael Stabile, a spokesman for the San Francisco-based adult film company Kink, which has an office in Las Vegas. “(In brothels,) you’re dealing with an untested public. (Condom use) makes much more sense for brothels than adult film sets, where performers are getting tested regularly.”

Performers also argue that using condoms during long shoots can result in breakage and microscopic abrasions that can make them more susceptible to infection.

In Los Angeles, the passage of Measure B, which introduced the condom mandate in 2012, was followed by a sharp decline in film permits: 485 in 2012 to 50 in 2013. Industry watchers say the same thing could happen in Las Vegas; a condom requirement here could compel companies to relocate to Florida or Oregon, which also have burgeoning adult film industries and don’t require condoms for porn shoots.

But even as condom talk swirls, many adult film companies aren’t willing to give up on Nevada. They say the performers acquired HIV because they failed to follow industry safety protocols. With such precautions, the porn industry hasn’t seen an on-set transmission of HIV in 10 years.

Porn workers say communication must be improved between performers and local health officials. If industry representatives aren’t involved in finding solutions, Nevada’s adult film industry could move underground, like many companies in L.A. have done, which can make conditions even more dangerous for performers.

“One of the things we have to start doing in Nevada … is work and talk with local health departments,” Stabile said. “When we come into cities, there’s a lot of misinformation and misunderstanding of what the protocols are and what the facts on the ground are. We know these issues are complex, the science is complex, and we need to sit down with the department of public health and maybe even legislators.”

“Certainly a condom mandate would make Nevada less appealing,” Stabile added. “But it’s far from that at this point. Those conversations are just beginning.”​

First On-Set HIV Infection In Ten Years Hits Nevada Porn Shoot

gayTwo gay porn actors have been diagnosed with HIV, one almost certainly infecting the other during a shoot in Nevada where officials say testing standards were lower than the industry standards.

They had both tested negative before completing two shoots. But in the time between testing and completing the scenes, HIV levels rose in one of them.

“In this case, the actor and production company thought he was HIV-negative during filming,” the California Department of Public Health said in a statement Monday. “Shortly after his negative test, HIV levels in his body rose rapidly to where he could infect other actors through unprotected sex.”

The states of Nevada and California do not require porn actors to be tested for HIV, and while the industry standard is to screen for the disease, the test they were using doesn’t detect the virus as early as ones used where protocol is tighter.

“Not only did this leave those who participated at risk, it made it much harder to track scene partners once the possible infection was discovered,” The Free Speech Coalition, a California-based trade group for the adult film industry said in a statement.

This is the last confirmed on-set HIV infection since 2004, after which the porn industry adopted a monthly screening standard for STI’s. They began testing every 14 days after a porn actress contracted HIV off-set last year.

Porn Wars: Is Las Vegas the new Silicone Valley?

Porn Wars: Is Las Vegas the new Silicone Valley?
Image
Patrice Sabourin of France poses for a photo with Jules Jordan Video stars at the 2012 AVN Adult Entertainment Expo in the Hard Rock Hotel on Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012.

By Andrea Domanick (contact)
Sunday, Sept. 21, 2014 | 2:01 a.m.

Inside Mission Control
Tucked among a cluster of concrete warehouses behind the Circus Circus parking lot, Mission Control Studio offers a new sign of life on an industrial parkway long marred by “For Lease” signs and defunct adult novelty stores.
Veteran adult film producer and director Lee Roy Myers opened the adult film studio and production facility in January.

The 10,000 square foot space includes an 18-foot green screen, custom sets fashioned to look like a schoolroom, doctor’s office and strip club, wardrobe and makeup rooms and a fully equipped production office. It’s difficult to tell the studio is home to productions with titles such as “Game of Bones.”

Myers said California’s condom mandate wasn’t a factor in his decision to uproot to Las Vegas. Most of the actors he uses already wear condoms.

Rather, it was the chance to run an independent operation and expand beyond adult films that drew him to the Silver State. Myers said he has as many, if not more, mainstream clients. His studio markets itself for use in commercials, music videos and web series.

Is porn legal here?
Clark County and Nevada have no laws directly addressing adult film production. California and New Hampshire are the only states with explicit legal protections for porn; both have state Supreme Court rulings that declare the production of pornography to be free speech.

The AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which promotes condom use in adult films, claims porn isn’t legal in Nevada because it falls under the category of prostitution, which requires condom use.

But legal experts dismiss the claim, saying adult film is protected by the First Amendment. “Is there legal language one way or another that we can have a Little League team?” asked Marc Randazza, a Las Vegas attorney who represents adult film companies. “No, but that doesn’t make it illegal. The lack of a case (questioning porn’s legality) in Nevada shows, simply, the lack of a problem. Wherever there is an American flag planted, you can shoot porn. If you try to say otherwise, then you are implicitly banning an entire category of speech.”

Moreover, the state Supreme Court’s rulings in California and New Hampshire imply a distinction between the performance of sex for money in pornography and that of prostitution. The bottom line is pornography is too widely accepted, too powerful an industry and too lucrative a trade for its legal status to be widely questioned. Even AHF admits its argument is tangential to its goals.

“The reason we drew the parallel is because regulation of the sex trade has been so successful in Nevada,” said Whitney Engeran-Cordova, senior director of AHF’s public health division. “(Pornography) is a legal business, but they’re not treating workers in manner that is considered a legal business.”

Where can you shoot porn in Las Vegas?
Adult films follow largely the same guidelines for shooting in Southern Nevada as their mainstream counterparts.

• Film studios are restricted to specific industrial zones.

• No permit is needed to shoot on private property — be it your neighbor’s house or a Strip casino — but the owner’s permission is required.

• Adult content cannot include live viewing by the general public, public seating areas or the consumption of alcohol. These measures are designed to distinguish film productions from adult businesses such as strip clubs.

Our competition
As the adult film industry’s business model shifts toward the Internet and streaming porn sites, it’s easy for companies to take their pick of where to set up shop. ¶ Nevada isn’t alone in its appeal. ¶ Among our chief competitors: Oregon, which boasts strong free speech laws; Southern Florida, which has an established adult film community; and Europe, particularly the Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania, which have open-minded cultures and strong social services.

Click to enlarge photo
Las Vegas has a new vice. You might not notice it, but it’s happening all around, in industrial warehouses, luxury high-rises and the bedrooms of suburban homes.

Porn is here, and more could be coming. With an estimated 90 percent drop in adult film permits issued in Los Angeles County after the 2012 passage of a controversial law requiring adult film performers to wear condoms on set, California’s $6 billion porn juggernaut is looking elsewhere, and its gaze has landed on Las Vegas.

Inexpensive and just an hour’s plane ride away, Nevada offers a vice-friendly attitude and lax film regulations that make the valley an attractive destination for adult filmmakers.

Still, porn’s ties to Southern California run deep, and its escape over state lines remains as much a political play as a quest for opportunity. There’s no promise the industry will stay, let alone grow, once the dust of heated political battles settles.

As California policymakers push to apply condom requirements statewide and the adult industry threatens to take its revenue stream elsewhere, Nevada finds itself pitched in the middle, eyed as both a pawn and a backup plan among two warring sides. Whether porn’s courtship with Las Vegas will be just a fling or the first steps into a new economic driver for the state remains to be seen.

•••

It’s tough to pin down just how much of California’s adult film industry is decamping to Las Vegas. The Clark County Department of Business Licenses doesn’t classify adult film companies specifically; rather, they fall into a number of categories, such as film studios and advertising businesses. Unlike Los Angeles County, which closely tracks and regulates film shoots, Nevada requires permits only for specific locations and conditions. Shooting on private property, frequently the choice of porn producers, requires no permit or notification, and the state has no explicit regulations about condom use.

“Vegas is looking more and more attractive as time goes by,” Kink.com founder Peter Acworth said. The San Francisco-based company, valued at $30 million, opened a Las Vegas office in July, filming a slate of highly-publicized exploratory shoots and launching web operations here. “I think that a lot of companies are doing what we’re doing. They’re setting up satellite offices and getting their feet wet with Vegas as a potential place to shoot.”

As many as a dozen companies are thought to have set up camp in the region, and many others shoot here but aren’t based here. Most prefer to keep a low profile, as one of the industry’s chief antagonizers, Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation, is close on their tails. The foundation in August filed a complaint against Kink.com with Nevada’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the first of its kind for the state.

“The move is happening, but quietly,” Acworth said. “Nobody wants to be Nevada’s test case. They don’t want a target on their back.”

The outcome of the ongoing feud remains uncertain, but if Nevada can position itself correctly, it stands to gain a slice of what’s estimated to be an $11 billion industry nationwide with the potential to bring new jobs and resources to the state, particularly to its fledgling mainstream film program.

“A lot of people I know in the mainstream industry started out in the adult industry in California,” said Jim “JR” Reid, president of JR Lighting, Nevada’s largest production rental company. “It’s a very good training ground. It provides opportunities for people to learn a craft. As a businessman, I think it’s a valuable asset to the community.”

In Los Angeles County alone, porn has created more than 10,000 jobs.

“Some big part of it will stay (in LA) and production companies will continue to be based there, so it’s not accurate to say that all of that $6 billion translates to Southern Nevada,” said Robert Lang, director of Brookings Mountain West. “But what it also gives to Las Vegas is that it’s building technical capacity that undergirds non-pornographic production and media. It adds some competitive advantage in scale to Los Angeles.”

•••

Porn and Los Angeles always have been easy bedfellows. Hollywood’s resources made Southern California a natural fit for adult cinema.

Las Vegas’ own history with porn dates at least three decades to the first Adult Video News Awards, the “Oscars of porn,” in 1984 at the Sands Convention Center. The valley’s low cost of living and vice-friendly atmosphere made Las Vegas attractive enough to maintain a modest but steady local adult film industry, which gained traction as LA’s film market grew more crowded and expensive. Nonetheless, the porn community here remained small and transient, with the bulk of workers dependent on LA’s resources.

That changed about five years ago, when an unidentified female performer in LA tested positive for HIV. Though the infection was believed to be contracted off set, the news, along with the 21 other reported cases of HIV in performers since 2004, prompted government health officials and lawmakers to re-evaluate safety measures. Years of acrimonious debate ensued as policymakers pushed to make condoms and protective barriers mandatory on adult film sets and adult industry advocates cited civil rights violations. They argue the condom regulation violates free speech and is a hamfisted solution to an exaggerated problem. HIV has not been contracted on set in the United States since 2004.

Still, in late 2012, Los Angeles County voters approved Measure B, which requires producers to obtain county public health permits for porn shoots and mandates that performers wear condoms during vaginal and anal sex scenes. California politicians and AIDS Healthcare Foundation now are seeking to expand the law statewide.

Their latest effort was defeated last month in the California Legislature, but the AIDS Healthcare Foundation vows to reintroduce the bill next year. Such threats continue to make producers uneasy, and they’re growing weary from the time and money invested in fighting back.

“Honestly, I’m just tired,” Acworth said. “I just want to get back to focusing on productions. It has taken up so much of my time in the past three years. That alone is reason enough to look elsewhere.”

And Las Vegas is getting more attractive as a result.

•••

Las Vegas’ appeal to porn extends beyond a quick plane ride and the ability to film condom-free. The adult industry as a whole has been forced to downsize in recent years amid dwindling DVD sales, a rise in piracy and the prevalence of free streaming porn sites.

Our growing tech sector offers resources for production and web operations, and it’s cheaper to hire talented workers here than in California. Acworth said he would’ve launched Kink’s web office in Las Vegas regardless of the condom mandate for just those reasons. Southern Nevada’s abundance of available housing means plenty of options for sets, and many homeowners are willing to open their doors to cameras since fees earned for a few days of shooting can cover months of mortgage payments.

While permits in L.A. can cost $800 to $1,000 a day, in addition to location fees that range from $1,200 to $2,000 a day, Clark County charges up to $45 for a permit, with no location fees.

“The extra hoops you have to jump through in L.A. versus a town (like Las Vegas) that’s open for new business and willing to essentially help you move forward, the stress difference alone is unbelievable,” said Lee Roy Myers, a veteran adult film producer and director who relocated from L.A. to Las Vegas last year.

•••

Just how long porn stays unregulated in Nevada remains unknown.

For now, elected officials have yet to pay much attention to the industry. But with no surefire way to keep tabs on its size, knowing when it hits critical mass will be difficult.

Clark County Commissioner Steve Sisolak said local elected officials likely wouldn’t hear about the industry unless concerns trickled down from the state level. Even the Attorney General’s Office, which is pursuing a ban on revenge porn (vindictively posting intimate photos or videos of an ex-partner) maintains distance from the industry.

“Regulation of the adult film industry is not a topic on our legislative agenda at this time,” spokeswoman Jennifer Lopez said. “Our efforts to ban revenge porn are on the agenda as it pertains to consumer protection issues, especially for minors.”

What eventually could turn lawmakers’ heads is the potential to lose out on an economic opportunity, or, perhaps more pressingly, the possibility of California’s political battle crossing state lines. The latter depends on the AIDS Healthcare Foundation. Though its OSHA complaint remains under investigation, foundation officials admit the move was symbolic, intended to call out Kink.com and provoke dialogue among policymakers.

“Our point really was that we could easily prove our case,” said Whitney Engeran-Cordova, senior director of the foundation’s public health division.

Engeran-Cordova called reports of a porn exodus to Las Vegas exaggerated.

“The film industry is embedded in L.A., and it’s going to stay there,” he said. “I think it’s a bunch of baloney. What they have done is stop getting permits. They decided that they don’t care to follow the law.

“If they do make an exodus and come to Las Vegas, at some point they’ll have to get a permit to do something. This may be the ‘Wild West,’ but it’s not that wild. Gambling, prostitution — Nevada regulates things, especially when dealing with vice. That’s how Nevada has been very successful. We would hope it doesn’t want to walk away from regulation.”

For all its appeal, Nevada isn’t a given as the industry’s potential new home. States like Oregon, which boasts strong free speech laws, and Florida, which has an established adult film community, offer their own competitive advantages. If Nevada does want to add porn, and the global revenue stream that comes with it, to its stable of vices, the playing field is primed for action.

“What happens this legislative session is going to say a lot,” said Marc Randazza, a Las Vegas attorney who represents adult film companies. “If a bill gets put forward (to require condoms or similar regulations), and it gets shut down, I think that will scream to the industry that it’s welcome here. If nothing gets introduced, that would be even better.”

But industry players say they’ll need more than a shrug from politicians and a “live-and-let-live” attitude from the business community to really put down roots here. And as the adult film business looks beyond California, Nevada isn’t alone in its appeal; states like Oregon, which boasts strong free speech laws, and Florida, which has an established adult film community, offer their own competitive advantages. Porn producers say they want to know their industry will be embraced, and if necessary, defended before they can be comfortable making their presence known and moving permanently to Las Vegas.

“When people speak about porn here, everything is still said a little hush-hush,” Myers said. “It has been made clear that new business is welcome, but making clear that the adult film business is welcome would go a long way with the industry and its dollars.”

What’s it like to be an extra on a porn set?
“The first shoot I did was 10 hours. It was supposed to be much shorter, but there were technical difficulties. I got $100 for the day. That’s usually what they give for just a few hours, too.

It was a parody of ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’ called ‘The Whore of Wall Street.’ It had a big budget, lots of production value, lots of crew. There were 10 extras total, and we were all hired to stand around in the background and cheer them on while they were doing a hardcore scene. We had actual lines of dialogue; there was like a 10-page script!

I was told to wear office clothes. I was playing a secretary, so I was told to dress like one. I dressed a little bit like a sexy secretary, but you’re just background, so they don’t really care.

The whole time, I could barely keep a straight face. I went to the bathroom, and the cabinet was fully stocked with enemas, condoms, vibrators, baby wipes, drinking straws. Weird stuff, right? They had a full-size cutout of the queen of England, as well as a framed photograph of Eleanor Roosevelt on the wall, which I thought was really odd.

But it was an incredibly professional environment. They run it just like any other production. I’ve also been an extra in mainstream, big-budget movies. Same thing.

They cover their legal bases so thoroughly. When you go in, you have to sign a release on camera, hold your ID up next to your face, state your name, information and consent. They ask if you were made to do anything that made you feel uncomfortable or that you didn’t expect to be asked to do. Lots of questions like that.

And then only after that, do they pay you. They really make sure they won’t get any accusations. And that was for both the extras and the featured talent.

I was really impressed not only with their professionalism but with their camaraderie. It was kind of like one big family. They were all joking with each other, it was a very ‘let’s go out for beers after this’ environment.

I think porn coming to Vegas is great. I think it’s a natural fit.” — Sarah Jane Woodall, local artist and writer

Follow Andrea Domanick on Twitter at @AndreaDomanick and fan her on Facebook at Facebook.com/AndreaDomanick.

Vegas porn shoot draws condom complaint

A Los Angeles-based health organization has filed a formal complaint with the State of Nevada, alleging a California porn company did not require its actors to use condoms during an adult film shoot in Las Vegas.

Filed by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation with Nevada OSHA, the complaint targets Cybernet Entertainment LLC, which does business as Kink.com and related spin-offs.

The filing describes “Vegas Road Trip,” a Kink.com film that shows performers engaging in sexual activities that allegedly “are highly likely to spread blood-borne pathogens” and other potentially infectious materials, according to a statement released by the AHF.

“Owner Peter Acworth thinks he and his companies can simply ignore the Federal OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard with regard to required condom use in his adult film productions shot in Nevada,” Michael Weinstein, President of AIDS Healthcare Foundation, said in a statement. “This new complaint in Nevada is based on the simple fact that they cannot hide from federal law there, or anywhere in the U.S.”kink

Nevada OSHA is currently reviewing the case. That investigation could prompt an inspection of the Kink.com’s local operations. Nevada has no condom law for adult films, suggesting the OSHA complaint is a way to seek federal enforcement akin to California’s law without legislative action in the Silver State.

OSHA officials in Nevada say a complaint regarding the porn industry is a rare one.

Kink.com owner Peter Acworth called the AHF’s complaint “baseless.”

“Current federal regulations make no mention of condoms, and uses standards that were developed in the 1990s for hospital labs, not porn sets,” Acworth said in a statement. “We will continue to work with performers, doctors and regulators to develop protocols that keep sets safe, and still respect performers’ rights.”

But this isn’t the first time the production company has come under fire. Nor is it the first time AHF has filed a complaint against Kink.com. The health advocacy group targeted the website last year with a formal complaint to California OSHA, alleging an adult actor exposed fellow performers to HIV. The complaint cost Kink.com a $78,710 fine, according to AHF.

Vegas Road TripThe filing follows passage of an ordinance passed by Los Angeles County in 2012 requiring adult film performers to wear condoms while filming. But the move could spread statewide, as the California Legislature ponders a similar measure.

The new rule sparked a budding exodus of porn producers from the Los Angeles area to other states such as Nevada, where regulations are loose in comparison to California. Recent Las Vegas transplants include major porn magnates such as Brazzers, Bait & Tackle, Corbin Fisher, VCX Ltd. and Bluebird Film. Vegas Road Trip porn

In Los Angeles, only 20 adult film permits have been requested this year, according to Film LA, which issues them. That’s about half as many permits as last year, compared to 485 in 2012, the year before the ordinance took effect.

It’s impossible to know how many adult films are shot in Southern Nevada. While permits are required for some locations, none are needed to film on private property — as long as crews keep the noise down after 10 p.m. and do not disturb neighbors. The rules f0r producing an adult movie in Nevada are the same as those for producing any action movie, and are the same in the city of Las Vegas or unincorporated Clark County.

Adult film insiders fear new condom legislation could force a collapse of the business, especially in Los Angeles, which has long been the capital of a domestic porn industry that reportedly generates about $6 billion in revenues while driving thousands of jobs.

In an open letter to Weinstein posted to his blog in May, Kink.com owner Acworth addressed California’s ongoing condom battle and its impact on the Los Angeles porn industry.

“If the current direction continues, I believe it to be inevitable that what remains of the adult video industry will leave the state,” Acworth wrote. “Additionally, I fear smaller production companies will shoot underground and that we will see a reduction in the safety on-set that the industry has worked very hard to build over the last decade.”

XXX church ‘Thank You, Jesus!’: One of the World’s Most Famous Porn Stars Finds God, Leaves the Sex Industry

At the height of her popularity, the actress, now 26, would film up to three sex scenes per day, the Daily Mail reports. Her career, which spanned seven years, not only led to prosperity but also spawned personal chaos as she turned to drugs and alcohol and ended up emotionally distraught.

While she made $900 per movie to start and soon became known as one of the hottest porn stars in the industry, the lifestyle began to take its toll on Ruiz: She started when she was 18 years old and barely had an opportunity to grow up before being thrust into it.

Jenna Presley    One of the Worlds Most Famed Porn Stars    Finds God, Leaves the Sex Industry

“It left me feeling drained,” she said. “I was so robotic, I was like a rubber Barbie doll. I had no emotions, I was no longer Brittni. I became Jenna Presley. I had an alter ego.”

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Wait Until You Hear How Many Hours a Day an EPA Official Confessed to Watching Porn at Work

A senior official at the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Inspector General testified Wednesday that a career EPA official stored thousands of pornographic files on his government computer, and has admitted to watching porn a lot while at work, sometimes for most of his day.

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Harassment suit filed in September by Capitol Police Officer Alice Valde against Nevada Capitol Police settled $99,999.99 paid by the state

capitol police nevadaThe suit filed in September by Capitol Police Officer Alice Valdez charging five of her fellow officers of discriminatory, inappropriate and hostile conduct toward her has been settled.

The settlement agreement filed in Carson District Court resolves all the issues raised in her lawsuit, with neither side admitting to the alleged conduct.

In return, she will get a lump-sum payment of $99,999.99 paid by the state.

The agreement says, “plaintiff hereby completely releases and forever discharges the defendants of, and from, any and all liability for all claims asserted, arising from or relating to the disputes and the allegations and legal claims of the complaint.”

Valdez accused officers Christian Normandy, Bill Walker and Chris Aranyos as well as Sgt. Mike Rubio of marking a variety of hostile comments about her age, size and gender, as well as sexist comments. She is one of two women on the force older than 40. It accused Sgt. Rich Mraz of doing nothing to stop the alleged abuse.

Rubio was dismissed from the Capitol Police. Mraz, who for most of the period in question was on medical leave, was demoted. The other officers including Valdez remain on duty.

Under terms of the settlement, Valdez and her lawyer, Jeff Dickerson, agreed to move for dismissal of the complaint with prejudice as soon as the payment is received.

It was signed by Valdez, all the defendants and Department of Public Safety Director Jim Wright.

The sad thing about this story is that Capitol Police Officer Alice Valdez is a nice person from our experience with her at the 2012 ANTI Corruption protests outside the State Capitol buildings. In fact, all the Capitol Police personnel seemed very professional, non-hostile and polite. We even said thank you in a post  found […]

State investigating conduct of Nevada Capitol Police officers

Posted: August 29, 2013
By Cy Ryan (contact) Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 | 1:45 p.m. Carson City —  A quiet investigation has been under way for about two months into the conduct of a group of Capitol Police officers, the governor confirmed today. Several officers, believed to be five or six, have been placed on administrative leave with pay […]

Former Nevada Capitol Police chief Tom Navin sues over dismissal

Posted: April 27, 2013 

We welcome Tom Navin to come out and protest in front of the State Capital with us next week and throughout the upcoming summer of 2013, Mike Weston will make a big sign for you!  Seriously, come on out, you were a nice fella most of the time. Nevada Appeal by Geoff Dornan Former Capital […]

Nevada Department of Public Safety – Capitol Police Division

Posted: March 29, 2013 

last summer we got to meet most of the Nevada Department of Public Safety – Capitol Police Division and our experience with them was very positive. These fellas (and the ladies) were all very professional when we did our protests and they talked with us and some got to know us and what we were […]

Under Brian Sandoval’s watch, capitol gets increased security

Posted: November 22, 2012

This Las Vegas SUN news story caught our attention because of the various innuendos including Governor Brian Sandoval’s comment that we feel may have been directed at us! The governor acknowledged there were no threats made in the past at these meetings of state elected officials. There may have been some nasty […]

LAWSUIT Nevada State Capitol Police Officer Alice Valdez accuses several fellow officers of PORN & discriminatory, hostile and inappropriate conduct

capitol police nevadaThe sad thing about this story is that Capitol Police Officer Alice Valdez is a nice person from our experience with her at the 2012 ANTI Corruption protests outside the State Capitol buildings. In fact, all the Capitol Police personnel seemed very professional, non-hostile and polite. We even said thank you in a post  found here: https://nevadastatepersonnelwatch.wordpress.com/2013/03/29/nevada-department-of-public-safety-capitol-police-division/

We see the case was filed in the corrupt Carson City court… Wonder if the judge will dismiss the case to cover-up for the State…  Stay tuned.

The male officers, according to the complaint filed in district court, suggested she could not do her job because she was a woman. She said one officer, Chris Aranyos, made comments last December about having sex with her. The complaint quotes him as saying that if it was the end of the world; he “would bend you over the desk and do you right here.”

In another instance, the suit said Aranyos rubbed up against her in a “sexual manner” referring to “her body in a lascivious manner.”

NV Attorney General CRIME SCENE  04032012From the Nevada AppealGeoff Dornan

Capitol Police Officer Alice Valdez accuses several fellow officers of discriminatory, hostile and inappropriate conduct toward her in a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Carson district court.

The complaint charges at least two officers made numerous comments and engaged in sexually inappropriate conduct. It accuses Christian Normandy, who supervised firearms training, of repeated hostile comments about Valdez’s size and gender and telling other officers he wouldn’t pass her range test next time.

The Capitol Police Division has been in existence for over 50 years, established in 1949. The division is comprised of 31 officers and one civilian. Capitol Police provides police services on numerous state properties, enhancing the safety of visitors and employees on those properties.

“Normandy treated Plaintiff differently on the firearms range and spread malicious gossip about Plaintiff,” the complaint by lawyer Jeff Dickerson states. Continue reading

Nevada ANTI-Corruption targets Nevada Department of Taxation for CORRUPTION, FRAUD and RETALATION

The Nevada ANTI-Corruption movement continues.  We plan a “protest blitzkrieg’ with new protests in Reno and other areas to focus on the Nevada Department of Taxation and the corruption within.

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