Nevada Division of Forestry warns drone users to keep their aircraft grounded during Nevada wildfires

drones fireThe Nevada Division of Forestry encourages owners of unmanned aircraft systems, also known as drones, to keep them on the ground during a fire and let firefighters and aircraft work to stop fires as quickly and safely as possible.

Due to recent incidents in which drones have interfered with manned aircraft involved in wildland firefighting operations, NDF wants drone owners to understand that flying drones interferes with the protection of lives, property and Nevada’s natural resources.

“If they fly, we can’t,” says Nevada Firewarden, Bob Roper. “It’s a major risk to pilots, ground personnel and aircraft. There may also be civil and/or criminal consequences that Nevada operators need to know about.”

Often a temporary flight restriction is put in place around wildfires to protect firefighting aircraft. No one other than the agencies involved in the firefighting effort can fly any manned or unmanned aircraft in such a TFR. Anyone who violates a TFR and endangers the safety of manned aircraft could be subject to penalties. Even if there is no TFR, operating a UAS could still pose a hazard to firefighting aircraft and would violate Federal Aviation Regulations.

“If you endanger manned aircraft or people on the ground with an unmanned aircraft, you could be liable for a fine ranging from $1,000 to a maximum of $25,000,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta. “Know the rules before you fly. If you don’t, serious penalties could be coming your way for jeopardizing these important missions.” Go here for more

STATE OF CORRUPTION: Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval used the term “unmanned aerial systems” instead of DRONES in his 2015 State-of-the-State

Nevada became one of only six national training sites for unmanned aerial systems. – NV Gov. Brian Sandoval

Drone NevadaCARSON CITY, Nev. (MyNews4.com & KRNV) — Here is the full transcript from Governor Brian Sandoval’s State of the State speech:

“Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, Distinguished Members of the Legislature, Honorable Justices of the Supreme Court, Constitutional Officers:

My Fellow Nevadans:

I’m incredibly grateful and honored that I have the solemn privilege of serving as your governor.

Tonight I wish to speak with you, not just about the state of our state, but about a plan to modernize and transform Nevada for its next 50 years of success.

Let me take a moment to recognize Nevada’s First Lady, Kathleen Sandoval, as well as my daughters, Maddy and Marisa, my parents, Ron and Teri Sandoval, and my sister, Lauri.

Tonight we welcome 20 freshmen legislators.

Governor Brian Sandoval State of CORRUPTION

Governor Brian Sandoval State of CORRUPTION

Twenty years ago, I was a freshmen legislator, so I know exactly how you are feeling.

Will all the new legislators please stand so we can acknowledge your commitment to public service?

Sadly, since we last met, a great many former legislators have departed.

We lost a Nevada giant in Speaker Joe Dini.

A total of 19 legislators will long be remembered for their service.

Please join me for a moment of silence in their honor.

Thank you.

One month ago today, at the final event of the Nevada Sesquicentennial, I helped seal a time capsule that is now buried at the Capitol.

drone-pilot-nevadaThe contents capture a snapshot of the Nevada family today, to be presented to a 200-year-old Nevada in 2064.

I wrote a letter to Nevada’s bicentennial governor for the time capsule.

As I wrote, I realized that the success or failure of the governor and people of Nevada in 2064 will largely depend upon our decisions today.

Ladies and gentlemen, we stand at a unique moment in time.

Having just completed our Sesquicentennial, we have proudly celebrated our state’s history.

Tonight we begin writing the next chapter of that story.

We must decide if that chapter is about getting through the next two years, or about creating a New Nevada – for the generations to come.

The most recent chapter of our story required strength and perseverance as we weathered one of the worst economic storms in our history.

These times were even more challenging because they coincided with two long and difficult wars.

Even though some said it couldn’t be done, we managed to lay the foundation for a New Nevada:

Nevada became one of only six national training sites for unmanned aerial systems.

We attracted Tesla in one of the most competitive site selections in our nation’s history.

droneWe became the home to dozens of other national brands who now employ Nevadans in industries of the future – cyber security, medicine, aviation, renewable energy, manufacturing, data storage and more. During my first State of the State Message in 2011, Nevada led the nation in unemployment. We set a goal then of 50,000 new jobs – we have almost doubled that. Today, Nevada’s job growth is third strongest in the country, we have cut our unemployment rate in half, and we have the second fastest growing population in the nation. We are adding good jobs in almost every sector, with business services, manufacturing, health services, gaming and tourism leading the way.

And yet, the success of our state is inextricably linked to the well-being of our most vulnerable citizens.

And I believe we have made significant progress in that regard.

Two years ago, 23 percent of Nevadans lacked health insurance, the second worst ranking in the nation.

Today, that number has been reduced by more than half, to 11 percent, and we are the fourth most improved state in the country.Google drone delivery

The uninsured rate for our children has dropped from 15 percent to 2 percent.

Nearly three-fourths of our Medicaid and Nevada Check-Up populations are covered by care management, which saves the state $13 million, and ensures that nevadans receive timely, cost-effective and appropriate health care.

In 2013, our behavioral health system was in a crisis.

Individuals waited days to access inpatient psychiatric treatment, and emergency rooms were overflowing.

Through the work of the Department of Health and Human Services, the specially-created Behavioral Health and Wellness Council, and many others, there have been dramatic improvements.

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