Meet the new boss …Same as the old boss? Who is Adriana Fralick Chief Deputy District Attorney in the Civil Division of the Carson City District Attorney’s office?

Carson City DA-elect Woodbury names Adriana Fralick as chief deputy of Civil Division

Carson City District Attorney-Elect Jason Woodbury today announced he will appoint Adriana Fralick to serve as Chief Deputy District Attorney in the Civil Division of the District Attorney’s office.

“I am very pleased to have someone of Adriana’s caliber step in to lead the civil division,” said Woodbury in a news release. “Her experience and background — especially with ethics and the Open Meeting Law — make Adriana a perfect match for the position.”

Ms. Fralick was raised in northern Nevada and graduated from the University of Nevada with a Bachelor of Arts in Speech Communication, and earned her juris doctor degree from the William S. Boyd School of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

“It is an honor to be chosen by Jason to serve the people of Carson City. I look forward to working with the Board of Supervisors, city commissions and department staff on issues important to the citizens,” said Fralick.

Lawyers, Guns & Money: David Houston interviews Jason Woodbury, candidate for Carson City District Attorney

Kaempfer Crowell - Jason D. Woodbury

Carson City DA Jason D. Woodbury

Ms. Fralick is presently the Executive Secretary of the Nevada Gaming Control Board and the Nevada Gaming Commission. She previously served as Legal Counsel to the Nevada Commission on Ethics, General Counsel to Governor Jim Gibbons and Assistant General Counsel to the Nevada Public Utilities Commission. Ms. Fralick also served as a member of the State Board of Education for two years from 2010-2012.

Fralick will replace outgoing Chief Deputy Randal Munn, who is retiring in December. Of Munn, Woodbury said, “Everyone in the City has appreciated the high level of service Randy provides. I join all those who wish him the best in retirement.”

“Won’t Get Fooled Again”

We’ll be fighting in the streets
With our children at our feet
And the morals that they worship will be gone
And the men who spurred us on
Sit in judgement of all wrong
They decide and the shotgun sings the songI’ll tip my hat to the new constitution
Take a bow for the new revolution
Smile and grin at the change all around
Pick up my guitar and play
Just like yesterday
Then I’ll get on my knees and pray
We don’t get fooled againThe change, it had to come
We knew it all along
We were liberated from the fold, that’s all
And the world looks just the same
And history ain’t changed
‘Cause the banners, they are flown in the next warI’ll tip my hat to the new constitution
Take a bow for the new revolution
Smile and grin at the change all around
Pick up my guitar and play
Just like yesterday
Then I’ll get on my knees and pray
We don’t get fooled again
No, no!I’ll move myself and my family aside
If we happen to be left half alive
I’ll get all my papers and smile at the sky
Though I know that the hypnotized never lie
Do ya?There’s nothing in the streets
Looks any different to me
And the slogans are replaced, by-the-bye
And the parting on the left
Are now parting on the right
And the beards have all grown longer overnight

I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution
Take a bow for the new revolution
Smile and grin at the change all around
Pick up my guitar and play
Just like yesterday
Then I’ll get on my knees and pray
We don’t get fooled again
Don’t get fooled again
No, no!

Yeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!

Meet the new boss
Same as the old boss

MUST READ: With the city’s dismal record involving Grand Juries and the lethargy of state and federal agencies seemingly unresponsive to citizen complaints, Woodbury and Fralick more than have their work cut out for them. The problem will not be what to do but where to start.

Regime Change Mark Krueger defeated Congratulations to the new Carson City DA Jason Woodbury

CC POLITICS: Amazingly enough, the Nevada Appeal interview of the candidates for Carson City District Attorney revealed…nothing we didn’t already know. Although both candidates spoke to the high turnover of personnel in the DA’s office, Mark Kruger spoke to personnel seeking “better” jobs elsewhere for reasons of higher pay and broader opportunities, while Jason Woodbury focused on a poor work environment and leadership issues.

Adriana Guzman Fralick bio

2012: Adriana Fralick, state Board of Education candidate, District 2

  • Adriana Fralick, state Board of Education candidate, District 2

    Adriana Fralick

  • District: 2

Age: 43

Hometown: Ajijic, Mexico (grew up in Sparks, Nevada)

Occupation: I have served as a public lawyer for the State of Nevada since 2005, including for the Governor, the Ethics Commission, and the Public Utilities Commission. I am currently employed by the Gaming Control Board.

Family: I live in Reno with my husband David Fralick and our two school-aged children. My mother and two sisters live in California and I have a brother who lives in Texas. I have 16 nieces and nephews, most of them live and attend school in Washoe County

Endorsements: family and friends; Associated General Contractors; Barbara Vucanovich, former Member of Congress, 2nd District, Nevada; Mark E. Amodei, Member of Congress, 2nd District, Nevada; Kevin C. Melcher, Regent, University System of Higher Education, District 8; Stacy Woodbury, Member, Nevada P-16 Advisory Council; Patricia Cafferata, former Nevada State Treasurer and former state assemblywoman

Political party affiliation: Republican

Website: http://www.adrianafralick.com

Questions:

How would you improve graduation rates state-wide?

By focusing on core subjects (English, math, reading and science) so that students have a solid foundation, including rigorous literacy programs in grades 1 through 3 – students must read by third grade; by identify failing students and working with them and their families; by rewarding good teachers; and by rewarding the students that graduate.

What is the most important school issue facing your district?

With Clark County School District as the country’s fifth largest, it’s often the focal point. However, each district is unique and a one-size fits all system won’t work. Northern Nevada’s school districts must be fairly represented and particularly in the coming legislative session when funding and reforms will be considered.

Many Nevada school districts face budget cuts in the coming school year. How do you at the state level plan to improve student education and preserve recent gains while balancing diminishing budget resources?

Each school district must be empowered with authority and flexibility to do what works best for its students. The State Board must bring together school boards, administrators, teachers, parents and students to create a collaborative system to exchange information, share resources and develop strategies to improve our education system statewide.

Letter: Former Carson City DA supports Woodbury

NEIL ROMBARDO TAKES IT UP THE ASSNeil Rombardo, the outgoing district attorney, submitted an opinion letter to Carson Now on October 10, supporting the candidacy of his assistant, Mark Krueger, for D.A. in Carson City. His letter briefly praises Krueger for his work experience and attention to crime victims. He then proceeds to criticize the other candidate for D.A., Jason Woodbury, through ad hominem attacks upon the people who support his election. Every first-year law student learns that engaging in personal attacks upon another person or his friends, instead of challenging that person’s ideas or principles, is very popular, but both illogical and somewhat sleazy.

Unfortunately, such attacks have become very popular with Mr. Rombardo and his favored candidate. For instance, the letter asserts a defense attorney supporting Jason Woodbury violated a court no-contact order (the district judge ruled it was unintentional), and another was recently charged (not convicted) for a drunken altercation with a police officer. He asks, “Do the people of Carson City want their District Attorney elected by these types of defense lawyers?” That is classic ad hominem nonsense, folks. Let’s look at some facts in evaluating who is the best choice for Carson’s next D.A.

Mark Krueger Carson City, Nevada

Mark Krueger Carson City, Nevada

The Nevada Appeal on October 2 reported that the Nevada Supreme Court has unanimously upheld the dismissal of 12 felony counts of sexual assault and lewdness upon two children under age 14 at the time of the alleged offenses. The Supreme Court ruled that the district judge properly dismissed the charges because the lead prosecutor (who was Mark Krueger) failed to make diligent efforts to determine the dates of the alleged offenses, a constitutional violation of the Sixth and 14th Amendments and a statutory violation of NRS 173.075, which requires that crimes be charged with reasonable specificity. The case is State of Nevada v. Jefferey David Volosin, Case No. 64082 (opinion filed September 29, 2014), for those who wish to read it for themselves.

The Supreme Court’s order in this case noted that the initial case investigation was done by South Lake Tahoe police detectives, and charges were brought in that jurisdiction. The matter was forwarded to Carson City police authorities because the two girls made allegations of sexual abuse occurring years earlier, in Carson City. The lead prosecutor, Mark Krueger, filed Carson City criminal charges without conducting any additional investigation. Here’s what the Court said: “The report arising from the California investigation was forwarded to the Carson City Sheriff’s Department, but the Carson City District Attorney appears to have filed the information without performing any independent investigation.” (Order of Affirmance, p. 6). The Court added: “Indeed, the State appears to have failed to even interview the victims who were, at that point, eighteen and fifteen years old, and presumably more capable of conveying useful information than younger victims would be.” (Order, p. 8).

Mark Krueger Carson City district attorney scandal

Mark Krueger Carson City district attorney scandal

When the public defender lawers representing Volosin objected on constitutional and statutory grounds to the lack of effort given to determining the dates of the alleged offenses, District Judge James Wilson had to agree. He also found the charging document was deficient because it charged multiple crimes in each count (Order, p.2). However, the judge gave the prosecution the opportunity to amend the charging document with more specific dates of the allegations, and to separate multiple charges. Mr. Krueger, apparently confident that Judge Wilson was wrong about the law, flatly refused to do this. So, all the charges were dismissed before trial, and the State appealed. The three-judge panel of the Supreme Court unanimously agreed with the district court judge, and the case remains dismissed with prejudice. Mr. Rombardo says he is planning an appeal to a full panel of the Supreme Court. Do that. Please.

Here is another factual circumstance to consider in evaluating fitness for the D.A. job: a lawsuit Mark Krueger filed in Lyon County, as a deputy D.A., against Lyon County and its county commissioners. This is Case CI 22576 in the Third District Court, which was initiated in August, 2012. At that time, Krueger was a senior deputy D.A. in Lyon County. He brought a civil lawsuit as the attorney of record for various county elected officials and employees, including himself, against the county commissioners in a salary dispute over the county commissioners’ decision to freeze merit pay increases. Anyone see a problem with this? Lyon County, and its commissioners, is the client of the D.A.– in the real world, you can’t sue your own client!

A senior district judge, appointed from outside the area to avoid conflicts of interest or bias, ruled that Nevada law (NRS 244.235 and NRS 252.180) prohibits a district attorney from filing a claim against the county for which he is legal counsel, and NRS 252.120 prohibits a district attorney or deputy from representing persons suing the county for which he is the legal counsel (Order, by Senior District Judge Charles McGee, filed October 23, 2012, pages 1-2). The court order dismissed the lawsuit because of the statutory prohibitions against a district attorney or deputy suing his client county. The court’s final sentence in the Order reads: “On any re-filing, Attorney Krueger shall not act as counsel unless he shows this Court a clearance for such representation from Nevada Bar counsel.” (Order, p. 2).

The Lyon County Commissioners had to retain outside legal counsel to represent them in this lawsuit: Madelyn Shipman, of Laxalt & Nomura, Ltd., in Reno. Krueger tried to defend his actions by saying he left his employment to join the Carson D.A.’s office on August 22, 2012. However, the demand upon the county was made the previous July 31, and the lawsuit was filed August 9, while he was a deputy D.A., in violation of NRS 244.235, 252.120 and 252.180.

I am mindful that the election is fast approaching, and that it is easy to take unsubstantiated pot-shots. Therefore, I am enclosing with this letter to the editor electronic copies of the Supreme Court’s 11-page Order upholding the dismissal of child sexual abuse charges in the Volosin case, and the 2-page dismissal of Krueger’s 2012 lawsuit against his own client, Lyon County.

I expect to be criticized as another low-life defense attorney supporting Jason Woodbury. I will admit, proudly, to being a defense attorney in Carson City for the past 6 years. On the other hand, I also served 25 years in the D.A.’s Office, 21 of them as the elected district attorney. As the D.A., I respected the role of the defense bar in the criminal justice system, and counted many of them among my friends, and, indeed, as my supporters during five elections. I served at least three terms as president of the Nevada District Attorney’s Association, taught police academy P.O.S.T. classes for many years, and was given the William Raggio Prosecutor of the Year Award by my peers in 2006. I believe I’m entitled to my informed opinion that Jason Woodbury should be elected as our next District Attorney, and I hope you will agree with me.

Noel Waters
Nevada State Bar #48
Carson City resident since 1962.

With the city’s dismal record involving Grand Juries and the lethargy of state and federal agencies seemingly unresponsive to citizen complaints, Woodbury and Fralick more than have their work cut out for them. The problem will not be what to do but where to start.

CARSON CITY POLITICS
THE IGNORANCE OF ONE VOTER IN A DEMOCRACY IMPAIRS THE SECURITY OF ALL. ~JFK

WHY DON’T HE WRITE?

by CC POLITICS

In a scene from Dances With Wolves, a trail guide and Kevin Costner come across the body of a would be western frontier settler killed by an arrow and the guide says “Somebody back east is asking “Why don’t he write?” Recently I was asked this same question and since I’m not shot full of arrows (yet), I really have no excuse. Carson City Politics had over 300 readers before the election and most were disappointed in the outcome for Ward 1. We can blame the election outcome on poor voter turn out, political inexperience of a new candidate, imbalance of financial resources, the poor support provided by the local Republican party, John Barret’s lopsided reporting and editorial, or any other explanation that will always sound like sour grapes. None of which really matters now and none of which will fix what ails our city government or help us prepare a future now mired in certain debt.

Kaempfer Crowell - Jason D. Woodbury

Carson City DA Jason D. Woodbury

With still two months before the Supervisor for Ward 3 changes hands, the present board appears deadly serious about ensuring some major spending gets set in stone before Lori Bagwell takes the oath. Bagwell’s more than cozy relationship with Karen Abowd during the campaign and her inability to articulate a clear platform until very late in the game leads more than one observer to question whether we will see any real change in the current rubber stamp board activities when she finally takes her seat.

Bagwell may truly be the “fiscal hawk” she claimed to be during her campaign but she’ll have to take a stand on some tough issues as Supervisor, unlike the dodge ball game she played on the Redevelopment Committee during the campaign.

On the upside, District Attorney elect Jason Woodbury is showing great promise, and his selection of Adriana Fralick as the Chief of the Civil Division is also a good sign. Even the most naive among us can see that both have an uphill battle to fix an office that at times has been more than remiss in discharging its responsibilities when it comes to City government. Ethical quandaries abound, including Board members benefiting from recent decisions, favoritism with non-profits, contracts with the statement of work defined by the contractor, and a municipal golf course being run like a good ole boys club with no real oversight. With the city’s dismal record involving Grand Juries and the lethargy of state and federal agencies seemingly unresponsive to citizen complaints, Woodbury and Fralick more than have their work cut out for them. The problem will not be what to do but where to start.

Adriana Fralick carson city DA

Adriana Fralick carson city DA Chief of the Civil Division

Rumors abound regarding if or when the animal shelter will be built given the emphasis on the downtown (and now the 3rd Street) project. No one seems to have noticed that in less than six months, the least important of the sales tax increase projects has become the first to be addressed. As the price tag for the downtown continues to increase with only token investment from business owners, anyone who objects to this debt ridden plan is immediately “immaterial” as stated by Barrette in a recent editorial. Who will pay for it for the next 30 years is not. Frequently heard is the argument that “it’s only a 1/8 of cent tax increase. Quit whining.” The fact is that today it’s $13 million in debt (the note for which is 30 years) and that’s only a portion of the cost of the projects. The parts still missing are the expanding requirements for the Community Center and more frightening, Abowd’s likely taxpayer funded plan for the “arts.” Still likely is a bailout plan for the existing businesses that will be impacted by the Carson Street construction. Given the Board’s previous willingness to hand out checks, we should not be surprised when taxpayers fork over money to business owners on Carson Street who will incur less street traffic during the construction; after all it’s only money. And what of the Hyatt plan? Appearing more and more like a political stunt, Mac Company’s website provides nothing new and Barrette never corrected his accusation that Helget spilled the beans. Abowd’s mythical “area behind the Nugget” was never exposed as truth or lie…perhaps only her hairdresser knows for sure.

What has this to do with the animal shelter? Out of sight, out of mind. After neutering the resolve of CASI leadership (which evolved into “we’ll support anything if it gets us a shelter”) during the campaign and creating the contract with the Nevada Humane Society, we’ve seen little progress. NHS used a goodly part of its newfound city money to mail an obviously expensive glossy newsletter announcing their agenda, which specifically does not include enforcement. Having a “no kill shelter” is an admirable humane activity but since giving over responsibility for animal services, complaints (including dog bites), receive little, if any, investigative response and commercial enforcement is non-existent. Animals endure deplorable conditions in at least one pet store in town but NHS cannot and will not do anything about it. City Manager Nick Marano’s failed experiment in animal welfare charity has resulted in the taxpayers funding the protection of feral cat colonies, zero ability to monitor NHS staff (which now includes a former city employee terminated for cause), and a lack of integration with other local animal welfare organizations. Not to mention an inmate count of roughly 18 dogs and some cats, some which are the beneficiaries of a charitable donation and now cannot be located. Even by “Common Core” arithmetic standards, $700,000 to take care of 25 or so animals doesn’t add up.

All this pales in comparison to the real nightmare before Christmas. Of recent discussion is the rumor that Mayor Bob Crowell will resign in the spring leaving a host of unpleasant options regarding his replacement and a subsequent Board appointment. If Crowell really cares about his legacy, there are no easy decisions but given his financial support for Karen Abowd’s campaign and her status as Mayor pro tem, maybe that decision has already been made. Or maybe this is just a rumor that keeps us awake at night.

So…where are we after all of this? We’re here in Carson City where dissenting views to the “tax and debt” mentality may not be popular but are still necessary. Carson City Politics is a personal blog and will continue to provide commentary whenever the mood strikes. Sour grapes may be on the diet for at least the near future but at least we’re not laying in the prairie stuck full of arrows and unable to write.

Carson City DA-elect Woodbury names Adriana Fralick as chief deputy of Civil Division

73552-adriana_fralick.jpg

Carson City District Attorney-Elect Jason Woodbury today announced he will appoint Adriana Fralick to serve as Chief Deputy District Attorney in the Civil Division of the District Attorney’s office.

“I am very pleased to have someone of Adriana’s caliber step in to lead the civil division,” said Woodbury in a news release. “Her experience and background — especially with ethics and the Open Meeting Law — make Adriana a perfect match for the position.”

Ms. Fralick was raised in northern Nevada and graduated from the University of Nevada with a Bachelor of Arts in Speech Communication, and earned her juris doctor degree from the William S. Boyd School of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

“It is an honor to be chosen by Jason to serve the people of Carson City. I look forward to working with the Board of Supervisors, city commissions and department staff on issues important to the citizens,” said Fralick.

Ms. Fralick is presently the Executive Secretary of the Nevada Gaming Control Board and the Nevada Gaming Commission. She previously served as Legal Counsel to the Nevada Commission on Ethics, General Counsel to Governor Jim Gibbons and Assistant General Counsel to the Nevada Public Utilities Commission. Ms. Fralick also served as a member of the State Board of Education for two years from 2010-2012.

Fralick will replace outgoing Chief Deputy Randal Munn, who is retiring in December. Of Munn, Woodbury said, “Everyone in the City has appreciated the high level of service Randy provides. I join all those who wish him the best in retirement.”