Nevada Newsmakers on Hillary for Nevada’s Every Nevadan Tour


Nevada Newsmakers host Sam Shad talks about Hillary for Nevada’s Every Nevadan Tour.  Sam: “It’s interesting you brought up Hillary Clinton and her organization. It’s been interesting to see them–and you wrote about this in the paper–going around the state and leaving no Democrat untouched. It almost reminded me of Governor Guinn’s first campaign where it was so much grass roots that people in the cities weren’t even really aware of how grass roots those campaigns were. And Pete Ernaut, of course, ran that campaign, and it was brilliant. I mean, it was under the radar. With Hillary Clinton, it’s not even under the radar.”

Nevada receives $11.2 million Homeland Security grant

Joker-billionaire-burning-moneyThe state of Nevada has been awarded $11.2 million from the federal Department of Homeland Security, it’s annual fiscal year funding for emergency management and homeland security projects.

Gov. Brian Sandoval said the money provides the resources to protect Nevada communities — especially urban areas that are considered high-threat areas. The Las Vegas Strip is one of the 26 such areas nationwide.

The portion of the funding dedicated to the Las Vegas area this year is some $3 million, a 200 percent increase over 2014.

About $3.7 million of the money is dedicated to supporting the National Preparedness System to help pay for training, equipment and other matters to prevent, respond to and recover from any acts of terrorism or other catastrophic events.

The grant also includes funds dedicated to cyber security, intelligence and information sharing, public information and warnings, operational coordination and mass care services in the event of a major incident.

David is going to expose Donald Trump, the clown

David is going to expose Donald Trump, the clown. Theories swirl. What is the GOP candidate’s motivations for entering the race. Trump proclaims: “I’m actually a Republican, I’m quite conservative – to put it mildly,” Donald Trump said when recently questioned on MSNBC about previously identifying “more as a Democrat.”

Questions about Trump’s political loyalties are surfacing. Forbes contributor Eric Kain was blunt in a 2011 article that asked, “Trump: Ultra-Conservative or Liberal in Disguise?”:

The only rational explanation for Donald Trump’s presidential antics is that he’s a stealth-liberal come to divide the GOP vote and sweep Obama to victory. “We must have universal healthcare,” wrote Trump. “I’m a conservative on most issues but a liberal on this one. We should not hear so many stories of families ruined by healthcare expenses.”

One organization is holding onto The Donald’s dough, it seems. The Clinton Foundation is not saying whether it has any plans to return $100,000 the real estate.

The U.S. court system is criminally unjust How your weight and the time of day can decide the outcome of your court case

corrupt judge
Featured Image -- 23521We like to believe that decisions made in U.S. courts are determined by the wisdom of the Constitution, and guided by fair-minded judges and juries of our peers.

Unfortunately, this is often wishful thinking. Unsettling research into the psychology of courtroom decisions has shown that our personal backgrounds, unconscious biases about race, gender and appearance, and even the time of day play a more important role in outcomes than the actual law.

Adam Benforado, a professor of law at Drexel University, describes these unsettling problems with the justice system in the recently published book “Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice.” The book uses psychology and neuroscience to examine and expose the illogical and unfair ways that judges, jurors, attorneys and others in the legal system make decisions about who is sent to prison, and who walks free.

Benforado’s research shows that mistakes in the criminal justice system are more common than we like to think, and that our personal biases play a disturbingly strong role. He also argues that there are clear and easy steps that we could follow to limit these injustices, if we care to take them. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Your research looks at applying cognitive psychology to law. Why is that important?

corrupt judgeOur criminal justice system has been built up over centuries and really millennia. Unfortunately when we look at the scientific evidence, we find that a lot of the underlying assumptions are not backed up by science. A lot of our legal system is based on incorrect assumptions about human behavior.

Can you give us an example of a case where assumptions made in the courtroom led to a verdict that was clearly wrong?

The one that stopped me in my tracks was a case involving John Jerome White. This was a brutal rape case from 1979 in Meriwether County, Georgia. We have the image from the line-up that was conducted in this case. The victim was brought in. She looked at these five men and she picked out the one in the middle. John Jerome White said he didn’t rape the woman, but he was sentenced and ended up spending a couple decades in prison.Featured Image -- 14047
Finally, the DNA from the rape case was tested – we didn’t have the capability back in 1979, but a couple decades later we did. And John Jerome White was not the attacker.
A line-up from a 1979 rape case. John Jerome White, who was falsely convicted of the rape and served 22 years in prison, is the man in the middle. The real perpetrator, James Edward Parham, is the man on the far right in the striped shirt. Parham walked free after the victim incorrectly chose White out of the line-up. Courtesy Adam Benforado.
What really startled me about this particular image was the actual perpetrator was in that line-up. He was actually locked up for another offense, and they pulled him in at the last minute. What this shows is that this victim looked eye to eye with the man who attacked her and picked out the man standing next to him.

That shows that good people who have every incentive to get things right can make terrible, terrible errors which are extremely costly. They are costly not just to the person who is wrongly convicted, but to the victim — not only have you suffered this horrible crime, but you are now responsible for putting an innocent person in prison. And, in this particular case, that actual perpetrator ended up going off and raping another woman in the intervening decades.

For me, that really summed up what this entire book was all about – the fact that the dangers to our community are not evil, greedy, malicious people, they’re our friends and neighbors. Those are the people who are ultimately responsible for some of the terrible injustice that is happening.

In 1979, we didn’t have DNA testing. Wasn’t this line-up the best option? Was there a better solution?

In that case, there were a number of things that were problematic. The woman had already looked at a set of images of potential suspects a few weeks earlier. One question is, was she remembering the person who raped her, or was she just remembering this image that she had seen? We know from laboratory research that just seeing someone’s image on Facebook can cause a person to be more likely to pick that suspect out of a line-up.

It’s also quite possible that some of the things the police were doing were highly suggestive. The woman’s initial description was of a man who was round faced with a stocky build. John Jerome White is rail thin. The only man who fits the description of the perpetrator is the actual perpetrator.
The lesson is clearly that we should rely on eye witness identification a lot less than we do. We know that tens of thousands of people are charged with crimes after being identified by eye witnesses. And we also know that a third of the time, eye witnesses in real identification pick out one of those innocent fillers. That’s a terribly high error rate, and that suggests we have to find other ways to identify perpetrators.

judge tatroResearch suggests that both the race of the victim and of the defendant influence sentencing. One study by researchers at Cornell found that defendants with more stereotypically “black features” were more likely to be sentenced to death. What do you think of that research?

That was a really powerful study. We’ve known that race was a problem with the death penalty for a long time. Far more people on death row are African American than would be predicted. And studies suggest that the factors that are meant to predict whether someone receives the death penalty don’t predict that – people who commit the worst crimes are not the ones who receive the death penalty.

Research from Cornell University suggests that, in a case involving a white victim, defendants with more stereotypically African-American features, like the man on the right, were more likely to be sentenced to death. Image from Eberhardt et. al., 2006. These images are of people with no criminal history and are shown for illustrative purposes only.
Research from Cornell University suggests that, in a case involving a white victim, defendants with more stereotypically African-American features, like the man on the right, were more likely to be sentenced to death. Image from Eberhardt et. al., 2006. These images are of people with no criminal history and are shown for illustrative purposes only.kill corrupt cops DAs and Judges
What was so fascinating about this study is it showed that it’s not just if you’re black or white, it’s how black you are. So people with thicker lips, wider noses and darker skin were more likely than other African-Americans with less stereotypically African-American features to receive the death penalty. In my mind, even if you would otherwise support the death penalty, this is just proof that we are not able to administer it in a way that is fair and just under the rules of the constitution.

And it’s not just race, right — thinness and attractiveness affect our judgments, too?

All interpersonal differences, which are not meant to have any impact on any aspect of trial, end up shaping how things go for defendants. With respect to witnesses, we know that attractive witnesses are more likely to be believed. We also know that weight has an impact. In one study, women who were overweight or obese were treated much more harshly by mock jurors than people who were thin.
A very important point is that a lot of these biases are operating beyond people’s awareness or control. So when it comes to implicit racial bias, for example, it’s not that judges who end up giving African Americans higher bail hate black people or are secret bigots. It appears that they are just susceptible and have been exposed to the same negative stereotypes linking blackness and violence or crime that we all have been exposed to.

bad lawyers judgesThose damaging stereotypes end up having an impact on real-world behavior. There’s interesting research that doctors offer different medical interventions based on the color of people’s skin. We know that recruiters look at a resume differently if it has an African-American name or a white name. In all these cases, the people that are engaging in this discriminatory behavior, it appears, are not doing so out of racial animus. They are doing it because they are engaging in automatic behavior which has been engrained over a lifetime of being exposed to a culture in which African American lives are devalued and blackness is coded with a lot of negative imagery.

What are other measures that we could take to improve decisions? I know that you mention “virtual trials” – what are those?

One of the things that I suggest in the book is that we need to control biasing factors. In essence, if we know that jurors and justices can be swayed by the attractiveness of witnesses, or we know that jurors place a lot of weight on whether the defendant is making eye contact, or his hands are shaking on the witness stand – if we know from research that that is not a good way to tell whether someone is lying, it makes sense to begin to control for those factors.judge tatro

The defendant’s skin color shouldn’t make a difference in the outcome. The prosecutor’s mannerisms or bombastic style shouldn’t make a difference. And yet from research we know that all these things are biasing factors. So why not control for these things by eliminating judge’s and jurors abilities to see the color of the defendant’s skin, or the mannerisms of the prosecutor?
The technology to do this actually already exists. We conduct business transactions in virtual space. We can do heart surgery without being in the same room as the patient. So why not think about the potential of virtual adjudication for the future?

In terms of benefits, it’s not just that this would prevent judges and jurors from biased determinations. It would also change the behavior of attorneys. One of the big problems we have in the way we conduct trials is we allow attorneys to strike jurors. In some parts of the country, black jurors are commonly kept off death penalty juries. A virtual space where attorneys didn’t know the race of the jurors would prevent that from happening.

judge nancy oesterleI also think it would significantly reduce the psychological strain entailed in providing in-court testimony. One of the reasons that rape prosecution are so difficult is that victims refuse to testify in court because they don’t want to be in the same room as their attacker. And with virtual space, that would lead them to feel less intimidated and nervous.

Adam Benforado. Photograph by Joe Craig. Adam Benforado. Photograph by Joe Craig.
You also argue that virtual trials could include a time delay in presenting information to the jury. What’s the purpose of that?

Frequently, evidence or testimony is presented in court and then subsequently objected to. So under cross-examination, a prosecutor asks a defendant on the stand, “Were you convicted of assault earlier this year?” The defendant answers, the defense objects to that, and the trial judge instructs the jurors, I’m sustaining that objection, disregard what you just heard.

But we know from experimental evidence that jurors can’t do that. Inevitably, evidence that they’ve been told to disregard then influences their later determination. So in a controlled setting, we could institute a time delay that would prevent that evidence from ever coming before the decision makers.

In the shorter run, are there other things we could do to improve our courtrooms? Let’s start by looking at judges.

justin brothers bail bondsIn the U.S., we think there are two kinds of judges: activist judges and umpire judges. Essentially, a person decides whether they want to be an objective, neutral judge who just calls balls and strikes, or an activist judge who follows their own agenda. But what the research from psychology says is that actually all judges are biased, and they are often biased in ways that are beyond their conscious awareness or control.
One of my favorite experiments in the book looks at whether a judge grants a person parole or not. You would think that the things that determine parole are the crime the person committed, and whether the person reformed themselves in prison.

But in fact, researchers found that the major factor was the time of day that the person came before the parole board. If you appeared first thing in the morning, you were more likely to get parole. Right before the first break in the day was the worst time. There is a clear disjunction between what the law says and what is actually determining outcomes.

I think most judges are extremely well-intentioned people who believe that they act objectively, to the best of their abilities. I think one of the best ways to change the system — a system that we know does include quite a lot of judicial bias — is simply to bring to judge’s attention the wealth of data that exists on what is going on. We know that African-American men receive higher bails. We know that certain people end up being sentenced to longer sentences based on demographic factors. Judges aren’t aware of those things until they look at the data.

And what about with juries?

Jurors are supposed to decide cases based on the facts and the law, and often times that’s not the case. Research shows that the jurors’ different background and experiences – what they bring to the jury panel – matter far more than differences in the legal code. It’s not supposed to matter what particular juror you happen to draw. But that is what we believe is driving a lot of outcomes in the criminal justice system.

There are actually de-biasing techniques that are being studied by psychologists as we speak. The challenge is to figure out ways to disrupt these stereotypes, by, for example, exposing people to counter-stereotypes – positive images of African-Americans, like Martin Luther King, Jr., and negative images of white Americans, like Jeffrey Dahmer. That has been shown to be effective at undermining these implicit biases.
More broadly, I think we need to think about as a society how we get rid of damaging racial associations. That has to do with depictions of African-Americans on prime-time television. It has to do with the stories that are reported on the five o’clock news. That’s where these biases come from.

Secondly, we need to think about ways to establish more diverse juries and more diverse judicial benches. The worst thing that we can possibly have is a jury or a court where all the people share the same set of biases. It’s much better if everyone is biased in different ways. Our benches and our juries are disproportionately white, male and older. That’s a problem, particularly because our legal rules themselves have been developed by white, older men over the centuries. To the extent that we cannot de-bias the population, diversity is a good second-best approach.
Ana Swanson is a reporter for Wonkblog specializing in business, economics, data visualization and China. She also works on Know More, Wonkblog’s social media channel.

Vegas doctor Binh Minh Chung accused of groping girl was let off after ‘impulse control’ classes

A Las Vegas doctor police say videotaped himself having sex with drugged patients in 2014 had been charged years before with fondling a 15-year-old girl who had gone to him for a case of pink eye, according to court documents unsealed Friday.

Dr. Binh Minh Chung‘s 2006 case was dismissed after he agreed to 100 hours of community service, “impulse control” classes and to “stay out of trouble,” the documents said.

And he was never told to stop practicing medicine.

The Nevada Board of Medical Examiners knew about Chung‘s 2006 charges but never took action against his medical license. Instead, the panel put a letter of concern in the doctor‘s file. Those are not made public.

Chung, a 41-year-old family practitioner, was arrested again in June of this year and charged with 10 counts of possession of child pornography and one count of using or permitting the use of a child for the production of pornography, according to court and jail records. The investigation started when Chung’€™s wife looked through her husband’€™s text messages and computers, according to his most recent arrest report. The wife found several videos of her husband having sex with other women and a girl, who appeared to be sedated.

Prosecutors said Chung probably will face more charges. He has been detained at Clark County Detention Center since June 20 with bond set at $550,000.

His license was suspended June 23. The board did not respond to requests for comment Friday.

The Review-Journal in June asked the Las Vegas Justice and Clark County District courts to unseal Chung‘s 2006 open and gross lewdness case in an effort to determine why the medical board allowed the doctor to continue practicing.

Judge Susan Johnson, who sealed the case in 2009 but was not the judge who oversaw the case proceedings, ordered the unsealing.

Court records made public Friday show the gross lewdness charges were reduced to a single count of misdemeanor battery before it was dismissed, and eventually closed to public review.

‘A BAD APPLE‘

Chung‘s 2006 case started with a woman taking her 15-year-old daughter to Integrative Family Medicine in the West Las Vegas Valley, according to an arrest report.

It was August 2005, the report said, and the girl needed treatment for pink eye. The doctor she had previously seen was not in that day, so she instead went to Chung.

During the visit, Chung asked the mother to leave the exam room, the report said. After she left, he asked the girl about her sexual activity. He told her to lie down on the table, then unbuttoned her pants and put his hand against her crotch, the girl told police.

The doctor then asked the girl to take her bra off so he could examine her breasts, the report said.

After the exam, the mother told police, her daughter “was not acting right” and wanted to go home immediately to shower.

Dr. Daliah Wachs, who runs Integrative Family Medicine, told prosecutors that after Chung was arrested she confronted him about the accusations, asking why he had the mother to leave the room. She said Chung responded that he did it “to get the truth” from the girl.

Wachs said she told Chung a nurse must be in the exam room anytime he was with a patient, court documents show. But the next day, a nurse told her Chung refused to let her in the room while examining a female patient.

“Binh was a bad apple. The second we figured it out we fired him,” Wachs told the Review-Journal on Friday. “He is a complete embarrassment to the medical profession.”

After the arrest, Wachs said, the medical records for the girl who had pink eye went missing. Walchs said she contacted police and the medical board, and the board informed her they were already investigating Chung.

Chung returned with photocopies of the patient‘s records, she said.

Walchs didn‘t hear anything about Chung again, she said, until he got arrested in June of this year. She still has not recovered the patient‘s original files.

DISMISSAL AND SEALING

Chung‘s 2006 lewdness case went on for three more years.

In June 2008 he struck a deal to plead guilty to a reduced charge of misdemeanor battery. A conviction for that is more like getting a citation, not the sort of crime that means jail time.

As part of the agreement, Chung was required to do 100 hours of community service work and to attend classes aimed at helping him control impulses. He also was ordered to “stay out trouble” for one year, meaning he could not be arrested or have other run-ins with the law.

Chung also was assessed a fee of $25.

The battery citation was dismissed Sept. 21, 2009, and was sealed shortly afterward.

But that came with complications.

The court papers were not properly served, Johnson said Friday in her order to unseal. Neither the Las Vegas Justice Court nor the Clark County District Attorney received signed motions, so neither agency expunged their records of the case.

Johnson in her ruling noted the public already knows many details of the case since it wasn‘t properly sealed.

“The public and the press have already learned part, if not most of [Chung‘s] alleged criminal history, resulting in this Court‘s Order to Seal Records having little, if any, effect since its filing in 2009,” Johnson wrote. “Weighing the press‘ First Amendment interest of openness against Chung‘s right of privacy ’€” that is, what remains of it ’€” it is evident that the balance tips in favor of the Las Vegas Review-Journal‘s position.”

The Nevada Board of Medical Examiners is scheduled to meet July 27 to decide whether to permanently revoke Chung‘s medical license.

Contact reporter Colton Lochhead at clochhead@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-4638. Find him on Twitter:@ColtonLochhead.

Washington Post: The staggering number of wrongful convictions in America

Tonja Brown Nevada Day 2010

Tonja Brown Nevada Day 2010

By Samuel R. Gross July 24
Samuel R. Gross, a law professor at the University of Michigan, is the editor of the National Registry of Exonerations.
I edit the National Registry of Exonerations, which compiles stories and data about people who were convicted of crimes in the United States and later exonerated. The cases are fascinating and important, but they wear on me: So many of them are stories of destruction and defeat.

Consider, for example, Rafael Suarez . In 1997 in Tucson, Suarez was convicted of a vicious felony assault for which another man had already pleaded guilty. Suarez’s lawyer interviewed the woman who called 911 to report the incident as well as a second eyewitness. Both said that Suarez did not attack the victim and, in fact, had attempted to stop the assault. A third witness told the lawyer that he heard the victim say that he would lie in court to get Suarez convicted. None of these witnesses were called to testify at trial. Suarez was convicted and sentenced to five years.

After these facts came to light in 2000, Suarez was released. He had lost his house and his job, and his plan to become a paralegal had been derailed. His wife had divorced him, and he had lost parental rights to their three children, including one born while he was locked up. Suarez sued his former lawyer, who by then had been disbarred. He got a $1 million judgment, but the lawyer had no assets and filed for bankruptcy. Barring a miracle, Suarez will never see a penny of that judgment. Featured Image -- 26071

The most depressing thing about Suarez’s case is how comparatively lucky he was. He was exonerated, against all odds, because his otherwise irresponsible lawyer had actually talked to the critical witnesses and recorded those interviews despite failing later to call them at trial.

Suarez served three years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. The average time served for the 1,625 exonerated individuals in the registry is more than nine years. Last year, three innocent murder defendants in Cleveland were exonerated 39 years after they were convicted — they spent their entire adult lives in prison — and even they were lucky: We know without doubt that the vast majority of innocent defendants who are convicted of crimes are never identified and cleared.

The registry receives four or five letters a week from prisoners who claim to be innocent. They’re heartbreaking. Most of the writers are probably guilty, but some undoubtedly are not. We tell them that we can’t help; we are a research project only, we don’t represent clients or investigate claims of innocence. Fair enough, I guess, but some innocent prisoners who have been exonerated wrote hundreds of these letters before anybody took notice. How many innocent defendants have I ignored?
Innocence projects do handle these cases, or at least some of them. They receive many times more letters than we do. I’ve spoken with lawyers who do this work, and who have successfully exonerated dozens of defendants. Most of them have clients who remain in prison despite powerful evidence of their innocence that no court will consider. And they all know that there are countless innocent defendants hidden in the piles of pleas for help that they will never have time to investigate.

How many people are convicted of crimes they did not commit? Last year, a study I co-authored on the issue was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It shows that 4.1 percent of defendants who are sentenced to death in the United States are later shown to be innocent: 1 in 25.

Death sentences are uniquely well-documented. We don’t know nearly enough about other kinds of criminal cases to estimate the rate of wrongful convictions for those. The rate could be lower than for capital murders, or it could be higher. Of course, in a country with millions of criminal convictions a year and more than 2 million people behind bars, even 1 percent amounts to tens of thousands of tragic errors.

The problem may be worst at the low end of the spectrum, in misdemeanor courts where almost everybody pleads guilty. For example, in July 2014 Wassillie Gregory was charged with “harassment” of a police officer in Bethel, Alaska. The officer wrote in his report that Gregory was “clearly intoxicated” and that “I kindly tried to assist Gregory into my cruiser for protective custody when he pulled away and clawed at me with his hand.”

The next step in the case would normally be the last: Gregory pleaded guilty, without the benefit of a defense lawyer. But Gregory was exonerated a year later after a surveillance video surfaced showing the officer handcuffing him and then repeatedly slamming him onto the pavement.

In the past year, 45 defendants were exonerated after pleading guilty to low-level drug crimes in Harris County, Tex. They were cleared months or years after conviction by lab tests that found no illegal drugs in the materials seized from them.
Why then did they plead guilty? As best we can tell, most were held in jail because they couldn’t make bail. When they were brought to court for the first time, they were given a take-it-or-leave-it, for-today-only offer: Plead guilty and get probation or weeks to months in jail. If they refused, they’d wait in jail for months, if not a year or more, before they got to trial, and risk additional years in prison if they were convicted. That’s a high price to pay for a chance to prove one’s innocence.

Police officers are supposed to be suspicious and proactive, to stop, question and arrest people who might have committed crimes, or who might be about to do so. Most officers are honest, and, I am sure, they are usually right. But “most” and “usually right” are not good enough for criminal convictions. Courts — judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, sometime juries — are supposed to decide criminal cases. Instead, most misdemeanor courts outsource deciding guilt or innocence to the police. It’s cheaper, but you get what you pay for.

We can do better, of course — for misdemeanors, for death penalty cases and for everything in between — if we’re willing to foot the bill. It’ll cost money to achieve the quality of justice we claim to provide: to do more careful investigations, to take fewer quick guilty pleas and conduct more trials, and to make sure those trials are well done. But first we have to recognize that what we do now is not good enough.

Read more here:

Radley Balko: There’s nothing ‘enlightened’ about executing the innocent

Radley Balko: We need to fix how we compensate the wrongly convicted

The Post’s View: New U.S. attorney’s office unit will review cases of possible wrongful conviction

Poll: 75 percent of Nevada voters want state to promote renewable energy

imageBy Kyle Roerink (contact) – Nevadans want their state government to promote clean energy.

Nearly 75 percent of respondents in a new poll said it would be appropriate for the government to promote the development and use of renewable energy, such as solar, wind and geothermal power. More than 70 percent said Nevada isn’t doing enough to promote renewable energy. More than 90 percent said consumers should be able to create electricity with rooftop solar panels.

That’s according to the poll of 500 Nevada voters conducted by GOP pollster The Tarrance Group and paid for by local think tank Clean Energy Project.

The results come in the aftermath of a legislative session where rooftop solar companies battled the state’s largest utility, NV Energy, over policies on solar generation. It also arrives as casinos are trying to cut ties with NV Energy. Both battles are being fought at the Public Utilities Commission.

About 35 percent of respondents in the sample identified as GOP voters, while 42 percent were Democrats and the remainder were independents. The margin of error was plus or minus 4 percent.

Of all respondents, 59 percent said climate change is the result of human activity such as burning fossil fuels.

Of GOP voters, two-thirds said they thought there was evidence the climate has changed in the past two years, but fewer thought climate change was primarily man-made. Those figure fall in line with national polling that shows that a growing number of Republican voters believe in climate change but doubt that it is caused by human activity.

Although the state limits how many people can provide energy to the electric grid and their homes through rooftop solar, Nevada has increasingly devoted more of its resources to implementing more renewable energy programs.

The state is on track to have its energy portfolio be 25 percent renewables by 2025. It’s also home to the most solar jobs per capita in the country. Between 2013 and 2015, the state’s rooftop solar industry grew by more than 1000 percent.

“The Silver State is a pioneer in the energy sector, and our commitment to renewable energy has added $5.5 billion to our economy in the last five years,” Gov. Brian Sandoval said in a statement released with the poll. “I am committed to the continued development of Nevada’s energy resources by removing barriers and developing better business models that benefit our ratepayers.”

Exonerated after 23 years, man discusses how easily someone can be wrongfully convicted

New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

[ooyala code=”pydndrdjodcdBBpgwdbwhpU5Vw_7g7Ym” player_id=”9ae34776f76145da969becdeb205e6a5″]

BROOKLYN —After nearly 23 years behind bars, and an even longer legal battle to prove his innocence, one man from Brooklyn is finally free.  Everton Wagstaffe was declared innocent this week of kidnapping, sexual assault and murder, but his case, as well as other developments, show just how widespread the problem of wrongful conviction is.

In 1992, Wagstaffe was a happy 24 year-old who’d had a few relatively minor brushes with the law for crack cocaine sales. But that year, his law enforcement encounters became extremely serious.

“If I’d just sat there waiting for something to happen,” Wagstaffe told PIX11 News, “I’d just be rotting away.”

Now 47, Wagstaffe spoke about how he’d ended up being convicted of the New Year’s Day 1992 kidnapping, rape and murder of Jennifer Negron, 16, in Brooklyn.  Wagstaffe and another man, who he didn’t even know, Reginald Connor, were both convicted…

View original post 606 more words

Man shoots down drone hovering over house

Man shoots down drone hovering over house

We need to talk anti-aircraft weaponry.

More and more so-called enthusiasts are sending drones into the sky. This means that more and more normal humans are becoming enthusiastic about shooting them out of the sky.

Especially, as in the case of William H. Merideth, the drone is hovering over your house.

Merideth, 47, lives in Hillview, Kentucky. As WDRB-TV reports, a neighbor heard gunshots and called the police. Merideth allegedly told the police that a drone was hovering over his house, where his teen daughter (he has two) was sunbathing. So he pulled out his gun and gave it a merry death.

The drone’s owner, police say, said he was flying it to take pictures of a neighboring house.

However, Merideth told WRDB: “Well, I came out and it was down by the neighbor’s house, about 10 feet off the ground, looking under their canopy that they’ve got under their back yard. I went and got my shotgun and I said, ‘I’m not going to do anything unless it’s directly over my property.'”

And then it allegedly was.

Merideth explained: “I didn’t shoot across the road, I didn’t shoot across my neighbor’s fences, I shot directly into the air.”

He says that shortly after the shooting, he received a visit from four men who claimed to be responsible for the drone, who explained that Merideth owed $1,800.

Merideth says he stood his ground: “I had my 40mm Glock on me and they started toward me and I told them, ‘If you cross my sidewalk, there’s gonna be another shooting.'”

There appears not to have been another shooting. However, Merideth was arrested for wanton endangerment and criminal mischief. There is, apparently, a local ordinance that says you can’t shoot a gun off in the city, but the police charged him under a Kentucky Revised Statute.

I contacted both the Hillview Police Department to ask for its view on proceedings. I will update, should I hear. However, an FAA spokesman told me: “Shooting at aircraft poses a significant safety hazard. An unmanned aircraft hit by gunfire could crash, causing damage to persons or property on the ground, or it could collide with other objects in the air. Shooting at an unmanned aircraft could result in criminal or civil charges.”

The FAA’s recommendations include not flying above 400 feet and “Don’t fly near people or stadiums.” The FAA adds: “You could be fined for endangering people or other aircraft.”

For his part, Merideth says he will sue the drone’s owners. He told WRDB: “You know, when you’re in your own property, within a six-foot privacy fence, you have the expectation of privacy. We don’t know if he was looking at the girls. We don’t know if he was looking for something to steal. To me, it was the same as trespassing.”

It is, indeed, hard to know whether things that buzz in the sky have positive or negative intentions. Amateur drones disrupted efforts to fight recent California wildfires to such a degree that there’s now a $75,000 reward for anyone who identifies those responsible. A Southern California lawmaker has created a bill that would make it legal for the authorities to shoot these drones out of the sky.

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Nevada Cops Ripped for Shady ‘Shakedowns’ Judges tore into Nevada authorities in two separate recent cases for elaborate, unconstitutional stings over big money civil forfeiture arrests

nevada is a police stateNevada Cops Ripped for Shady ‘Shakedowns’ Judges tore into Nevada authorities in two separate recent cases for elaborate, unconstitutional stings over big money civil forfeiture arrests. Paul Phua and Straughn Gorman would appear to have little in common.

When last seen Phua was departing Las Vegas in his $48 million Gulfstream. He’s a Malaysian businessman and high-rolling gambler with reputed ties to a Hong Kong criminal triad. Phua has denied any criminal associations, and his defense attorney David Chesnoff calls such assertions “garbage.”

Gorman, meanwhile, presumably left Nevada from behind the wheel of his ransacked recreational vehicle. He lists a Hawaii beach shop as his place of employment, but authorities suspect he also traffics marijuana. All it lacks is evidence.

Against formidable odds, both men managed to beat the House in Nevada in two high-profile federal cases that now have prosecutors and law enforcement feeling a little heat—over searches for drugs and dirty money that judges say never should have happened.

Phua was the alleged ringleader of a World Cup soccer betting operation that in 2014 half-cleverly set up shop in the high-roller villas at Caesars Palace when the FBI and Nevada gaming authorities came calling.

In the ensuing months, the government linked Phua and the betting ring to Wo Hop To gang leader Cheung Chi-tai, whose violent reputation and connection to Macau’s lucrative VIP gambling salons menaces more than one Nevada gaming corporation these days.

Cheung was identified in a 1992 U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations as one of nine Wo Hop To leaders. Cheung was linked to (but not charged with) a vicious beating of a Macau casino dealer in 2011. One of his associates was charged and convicted in the assault.

A passport with Cheung’s name on it was recovered during the search of the high-roller villas.

But as it turns out law enforcement’s investigation of the betting ring was also too clever by half. Cops cut off the Internet service to the Phua group’s villas, then sent in FBI agents disguised as technicians to scout the premises—in effect to gather evidence without a warrant for their case.

What investigators saw resembled a standard sports betting “wire room” replete with eight computers and 20 monitors. Phua’s operation was said to have handled approximately $13 million in illegal bets before the FBI came calling on July 13 of last year.

During the preliminary phase, U.S. Magistrate Judge Peggy Leen called the law enforcement investigation strategy “fatally flawed” and questioned whether the government had probable cause before seeking a search warrant. She also determined material statements made by FBI agents in the case were “false and misleading.”

Although six of eight suspects pleaded guilty to dramatically reduced charges and received probation, Phua pressed his bet. Represented by veteran defense attorneys Chesnoff and Tom Goldstein, Phua watched as much of the evidence against him was thrown out by U.S. District Judge Andre Gordon.

“It’s a system where it’s about money and not about justice.”

money-greedy1“Permitting the government to create the need for the occupant to invite a third party into his or her home would effectively allow the government to conduct warrantless searches of the vast majority of residences and hotel rooms in America,” Gordon said during an evidentiary hearing.

On June 1, Gordon dismissed the case. Another month passed before U.S. Attorney Daniel Bogden said his office disagreed with Gordon’s legal reasoning, but it declined to appeal the case.

Then there’s Gorman, who has no criminal record but found himself stopped twice on the same day in January 2013 outside of Elko, a town in northern Nevada. He was pulled over the first time by a Nevada Highway Patrol trooper for driving too slowly in the fast lane of Interstate 80. The trooper was suspicious of Gorman, but lacked the probable cause to search his RV. He couldn’t detain Gorman long enough to fetch a drug-sniffing dog.

So he let Gorman go—and radioed ahead to an Elko County sheriff’s deputy. Accompanied by a trained canine, the deputy stopped Gorman a second time. Although Fido supposedly whiffed something, a follow-up found $167,000 in cash hidden in the RV, but not a pinch of sinsemilla.

Once seized, the Nevada U.S. Attorney’s office immediately began the process of civil forfeiture. The two stops were obviously related, but the prosecutors failed to make that distinction in their pleadings before the court. Senior U.S. District Judge Larry Hicks ripped into the government in dismissing the forfeiture action on June 12, and noted that Gorman was entitled to seek his attorney’s fees.

“The court expects and relies upon the United States attorney’s office to be candid and forthcoming with material information uniquely held only in possession of the government and clearly relevant to central issues before the court,” Hicks wrote. “That did not occur here.”
Gorman’s attorney, Vince Savarese, is a veteran of many battles in civil forfeiture cases against the government.

“These guys have a personal financial incentive to shake down as many vehicles as possible,” Savarese said, alluding to the U.S. Department of Justice’s controversial Equitable Sharing Program. “They had no reasonable suspicion to stop my client.”

DOJ statistics report more than $4.5 billion in forfeited assets have been shared with more than 8,000 state and local law enforcement agencies in what it calls “one of the most important provisions of asset forfeiture.” The Washington Post reported in January that law enforcement has made more than 55,000 seizures worth in excess of $3 billion since 2008.

“The U.S. Attorney was not candid with the court on the facts of the case,” Savarese said. “The back end of the decision is devoted to chastising the government as to how they handled this thing in court. We had to go through the process, by the numbers, to prove everything. They weren’t willing to acknowledge anything—even though they knew this was something that could never be hidden.”

Former Nevada ACLU counsel Allen Lichtenstein, who has monitored forfeiture cases in the state for many years, said the judge’s expressed ire ought to send a message to law enforcement and federal prosecutors.

“As far as forfeiture goes, this is nationwide,” Lichtenstein said. “This has been going on for decades. Part of the problem is the law lets you eat what you catch. It’s ripe corruption, and it is ripe for overzealous prosecution. It’s a system where it’s about money and not about justice.”

The pair of recent legal setbacks proved that the house doesn’t always win in the Nevada justice system—as long as the players have the money to fight.

“I guess what I’m most pleased about is that the federal judges, when presented with evidence of law enforcement not telling the straight story, called them on it,” Phua attorney Chesnoff said. “That kind of judicial courage puts teeth in the Constitution.”
Paul Phua and Straughn Gorman would appear to have little in common.

When last seen Phua was departing Las Vegas in his $48 million Gulfstream. He’s a Malaysian businessman and high-rolling gambler with reputed ties to a Hong Kong criminal triad. Phua has denied any criminal associations, and his defense attorney David Chesnoff calls such assertions “garbage.”

Gorman, meanwhile, presumably left Nevada from behind the wheel of his ransacked recreational vehicle. He lists a Hawaii beach shop as his place of employment, but authorities suspect he also traffics marijuana. All it lacks is evidence.

Against formidable odds, both men managed to beat the House in Nevada in two high-profile federal cases that now have prosecutors and law enforcement feeling a little heat—over searches for drugs and dirty money that judges say never should have happened.

Phua was the alleged ringleader of a World Cup soccer betting operation that in 2014 half-cleverly set up shop in the high-roller villas at Caesars Palace when the FBI and Nevada gaming authorities came calling.

In the ensuing months, the government linked Phua and the betting ring to Wo Hop To gang leader Cheung Chi-tai, whose violent reputation and connection to Macau’s lucrative VIP gambling salons menaces more than one Nevada gaming corporation these days.

Cheung was identified in a 1992 U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations as one of nine Wo Hop To leaders. Cheung was linked to (but not charged with) a vicious beating of a Macau casino dealer in 2011. One of his associates was charged and convicted in the assault.

A passport with Cheung’s name on it was recovered during the search of the high-roller villas.

But as it turns out law enforcement’s investigation of the betting ring was also too clever by half. Cops cut off the Internet service to the Phua group’s villas, then sent in FBI agents disguised as technicians to scout the premises—in effect to gather evidence without a warrant for their case.

What investigators saw resembled a standard sports betting “wire room” replete with eight computers and 20 monitors. Phua’s operation was said to have handled approximately $13 million in illegal bets before the FBI came calling on July 13 of last year.

During the preliminary phase, U.S. Magistrate Judge Peggy Leen called the law enforcement investigation strategy “fatally flawed” and questioned whether the government had probable cause before seeking a search warrant. She also determined material statements made by FBI agents in the case were “false and misleading.”

Although six of eight suspects pleaded guilty to dramatically reduced charges and received probation, Phua pressed his bet. Represented by veteran defense attorneys Chesnoff and Tom Goldstein, Phua watched as much of the evidence against him was thrown out by U.S. District Judge Andre Gordon.

“It’s a system where it’s about money and not about justice.”
“Permitting the government to create the need for the occupant to invite a third party into his or her home would effectively allow the government to conduct warrantless searches of the vast majority of residences and hotel rooms in America,” Gordon said during an evidentiary hearing.

On June 1, Gordon dismissed the case. Another month passed before U.S. Attorney Daniel Bogden said his office disagreed with Gordon’s legal reasoning, but it declined to appeal the case.

Then there’s Gorman, who has no criminal record but found himself stopped twice on the same day in January 2013 outside of Elko, a town in northern Nevada. He was pulled over the first time by a Nevada Highway Patrol trooper for driving too slowly in the fast lane of Interstate 80. The trooper was suspicious of Gorman, but lacked the probable cause to search his RV. He couldn’t detain Gorman long enough to fetch a drug-sniffing dog.

So he let Gorman go—and radioed ahead to an Elko County sheriff’s deputy. Accompanied by a trained canine, the deputy stopped Gorman a second time. Although Fido supposedly whiffed something, a follow-up found $167,000 in cash hidden in the RV, but not a pinch of sinsemilla.

Once seized, the Nevada U.S. Attorney’s office immediately began the process of civil forfeiture. The two stops were obviously related, but the prosecutors failed to make that distinction in their pleadings before the court. Senior U.S. District Judge Larry Hicks ripped into the government in dismissing the forfeiture action on June 12, and noted that Gorman was entitled to seek his attorney’s fees.

“The court expects and relies upon the United States attorney’s office to be candid and forthcoming with material information uniquely held only in possession of the government and clearly relevant to central issues before the court,” Hicks wrote. “That did not occur here.”
Gorman’s attorney, Vince Savarese, is a veteran of many battles in civil forfeiture cases against the government.

“These guys have a personal financial incentive to shake down as many vehicles as possible,” Savarese said, alluding to the U.S. Department of Justice’s controversial Equitable Sharing Program. “They had no reasonable suspicion to stop my client.”

DOJ statistics report more than $4.5 billion in forfeited assets have been shared with more than 8,000 state and local law enforcement agencies in what it calls “one of the most important provisions of asset forfeiture.” The Washington Post reported in January that law enforcement has made more than 55,000 seizures worth in excess of $3 billion since 2008.

“The U.S. Attorney was not candid with the court on the facts of the case,” Savarese said. “The back end of the decision is devoted to chastising the government as to how they handled this thing in court. We had to go through the process, by the numbers, to prove everything. They weren’t willing to acknowledge anything—even though they knew this was something that could never be hidden.”

Former Nevada ACLU counsel Allen Lichtenstein, who has monitored forfeiture cases in the state for many years, said the judge’s expressed ire ought to send a message to law enforcement and federal prosecutors.

“As far as forfeiture goes, this is nationwide,” Lichtenstein said. “This has been going on for decades. Part of the problem is the law lets you eat what you catch. It’s ripe corruption, and it is ripe for overzealous prosecution. It’s a system where it’s about money and not about justice.”

The pair of recent legal setbacks proved that the house doesn’t always win in the Nevada justice system—as long as the players have the money to fight.

“I guess what I’m most pleased about is that the federal judges, when presented with evidence of law enforcement not telling the straight story, called them on it,” Phua attorney Chesnoff said. “That kind of judicial courage puts teeth in the Constitution.”

SOURCE: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/07/23/nevada-cops-ripped-for-shady-shakedowns.html

Hillary Clinton Releases Eight Years of Tax Returns

Ace News Services

hillary-clinton-cuba.jpg?quality=65&strip=color&w=150

#AceNewsReport – July.31: Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton released eight years of tax returns Friday, as well as a complete listing of the millions she and her husband have received for paid speeches over the years.

Clinton’s release of her returns from 2007-2014 bring to 38 the number of years of publicly released tax returns by the Clintons over the course of four presidential campaigns, topping former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s previous record of 33 years set last month.

Since 2007, the Clintons have paid $43,885,310 in federal taxes, with an effective tax rate of 35.7 percent in 2014—roughly the same as Bush’s average of 36 percent.

The Clintons reported devoting more than 10 percent of their income to charity, outpacing Bush’s reported 3.1 percent average from 2007-2013.

Earlier this year, Clinton filed her personal financial disclosure revealing she and her husband earned more than $30 million in paid…

View original post 126 more words

Why the Politicians are Laughing – Hillary’s Unapologetic Corruption

sentinelblog

Source: Armstrong Economics

According to the Wall Street Journal, total donations by UBS to the Clinton Foundation grew from less than $60,000 at the end of 2008 to approximately $600,000 by the end of 2014. The Wall Street Journal reports that the bank also lent $32 million through entrepreneurship and inner city loan programs that it launched in association with the Clinton Foundation. At the very same time, they were paying former President Bill Clinton $1.5 million to participate in a series of corporate Q&A sessions with UBS Chief Executive Bob McCann. You really cannot make up this stuff.

On top of that, the Inspector General recommended that the Justice Department investigate Hillary’s erasing of emails for that would have clearly been criminal. Of course, the Justice Department would NEVER investigate Hillary while in the hands of the Obama Administration. This is why the…

View original post 11 more words

Ultimate Proof The U.S. Dollar Is Worthless

sentinelblog

Source: Bullion Bulls, by Jeff Nielson

The United States is bankrupt. This is a simple statement of fact. With a relatively puny GDP of (supposedly) $17 trillion; this Deadbeat Debtor already has debts and liabilities exceeding $200 trillion. In the corporate world; such obvious/hopeless insolvency would necessitate an immediate “restructuring” meaning either a complete liquidation of the entity itself, or massive write-downs on its debts.

Yet utter the statement above to a Defender of the U.S. economy, and one will always get the same reply. “The United States can never be bankrupted (no matter how large its debts), because with its printing press it can print-up enough dollars to ‘pay’ its debts.”

There is an enormous, logical fallacy in that assertion. It is the fact that very people understand this logical fallacy which is the only reason that the (worthless) U.S. dollar does not already have…

View original post 192 more words

Help Ty Robben at gofundme.com and support the 7th Amendment protest coming to Reno Nevada August 2015.

Help support the 7th Amendment protest coming to Reno Nevada August 2015.

We got funding and did the protest – see the story here: 

https://nevadastatepersonnelwatch.wordpress.com/2015/08/14/7th-amendment-protest-goes-off-at-the-reno-federal-court-ty-robben-proclaims-summary-judgment-unconstitutional/

http://www.gofundme.com/8g6pqpf7es

We got funding and did the protest – see the story here: 

https://nevadastatepersonnelwatch.wordpress.com/2015/08/14/7th-amendment-protest-goes-off-at-the-reno-federal-court-ty-robben-proclaims-summary-judgment-unconstitutional/

UPDATE 08/09/2015: I got funding – Thanks to those who supported me as this protest starts this week. We are making new signs and I’ll have pictures up as soon as we hit the streets this week (or next depending on weather).

Reno Nevada resident Ty Robben plans to demonstrate in the very near future about the Reno Federal Court and in particular, Judge Miranda Du’s use of summary judgement to dismiss certain causes of action in his civil rights lawsuit against various Carson City officials including former disgraced DA Neil Rombardo , his corrupt assistant DA Mark Krueger and corrupt Carson City justice of the peace “judge” John Tatro.

“I plan to stay in front of the Reno courthouse with my signs until I get my day in court” says Robben.

Miranda Du judge,

Ty Robben says “This is hurting me financially and preventing me from getting treatment for my dog Tytan who’s suffering from bone cancer. They destroyed me and my family and now I am going to lose my dog.”

Ty Robben says “This is hurting me financially and preventing me from getting treatment for my dog Tytan who’s suffering from bone cancer. They destroyed me and my family and now I am going to lose my dog.” Update 08/04/2015 my dog passed. 

Ty Robben needs funding at http://www.gofundme.com/8g6pqpf7es to bring “The WORLDS LARGEST CRIME SCENE TAPE” to the Reno Federal Courthouse where he want’s to display the signs and use his 1st Amendment rights to protest the violation of his 7th Amendment rights. See previous KOLO news story here: https://youtu.be/gbk0rKPnbfs

Those listed are Defendants’ in a civil rights lawsuit filed by Robben that includes a cornucopia of claims including malicious prosecution, defamation, RICO (racketeering), false imprisonment, false arrest, and virtually every Constitutional amendment a person can suffer from including the 1st 2nd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th and 14th amendments of the US Constitution!

Ty Robben is fed-up and demands justice or there will be no peace. Stay tuned as the next Bundy Ranch heats up in crazy Nevada.

Reno Federal Judge Miranda Du is at the center of the 7th Amendment Summary Judgment is unconstitutional protest in Reno Nevada.

Reno Federal Judge Miranda Du is at the center of the 7th Amendment Summary Judgment is unconstitutional protest in Reno Nevada. Dirty harry Reid introduces Miranda Du at nomination hearing

Judge Miranda Du

Reno Federal Judge Miranda Du is at the center of the 7th Amendment Summary Judgment is unconstitutional protest in Reno Nevada.

Summary Judgment is unconstitutional. “In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.” – – The 7th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America

Summary judgment is cited as a significant reason for the dramatic decline in the number of jury trials in civil cases in federal court. Judges extensively use the device to clear the federal docket of cases deemed meritless. Recent scholarship even has called for the mandatory use of summary judgment prior to settlement. While other scholars question the use of summary judgment in certain types of cases (for example, civil rights cases), all scholars and judges assume away a critical question: whether summary judgment is constitutional. The conventional wisdom is that the Supreme Court settled the issue a century ago in Fidelity & Deposit Co. v. United States. But a review of that case reveals that the conventional wisdom is wrong: the constitutionality of summary judgment has never been resolved by the Supreme Court. This Essay is the first to examine the question and takes the seemingly heretical position that summary judgment is unconstitutional. The question is governed by the Seventh Amendment which provides that “[i]n Suits at common law, . . . the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.”

Judge Du Reno

Judge Miranda Du and dirty Harry Reid

The Supreme Court has held that “common law” in the Seventh Amendment refers to the English common law in 1791. This Essay demonstrates that no procedure similar to summary judgment existed under the English common law and also reveals that summary judgment violates the core principles or “substance” of the English common law. The Essay concludes that, despite the uniform acceptance of the device, summary judgment is unconstitutional.

The Essay then responds to likely objections, including that the federal courts cannot function properly without summary judgment. By describing the burden that the procedure of summary judgment imposes upon the courts, the Essay argues that summary judgment may not be necessary to the judicial system but rather, by contrast, imposes significant costs upon the system.

read more: Why summary judgment is unconstitutional

Stay tuned as this story develops.

Read more about Judge Miranda Du here: Harry Reid introduces his 2011 Judge Miranda Du at nomination hearing and calls her a “boat child”

Constitutional Conversation: 7th Amendment

Judge Miranda Du

7th Amendment protest coming to Reno next week to demand the use of summary judgment as unconstitutional?

7th Amendment protest coming to Reno next week to demand the use of summary judgment as unconstitutional?

5/07/30/7th-amendment-protest-coming-to-reno-next-week-to-demand-the-use-of-summary-judgment-as-unconstitutional/

Magna Charta, The Egg Farmer, And Jade Helm

Gumshoe News

jadeee helm

by Mary W Maxwell, PhD, LLB, July 31, 2015.

So far I have not heard of anyone resisting Jade Helm. It is good to see, however, that there are Youtube videos of citizens resisting pull-overs by cops. Some have had 4 million hits.

You know, it takes a lot of work to find out how to resist. I discovered a good piece the other day written by an Australianized American, Terry Shulze. As a barrister he was defending an egg farmer from having to have his business dictated to by a monopoly. Give me ten minutes of your time to see how he ran the case. It’s  ’Tude City, believe me.

View original post 1,390 more words

Is Jade Helm More About War or Martial Law? A Statistical Analysis

Christian Patriots

[Image caption: Jade Helm: Is it more about war or martial law?]

The purpose of this article is to take existing on-the-ground-evidence and see what consistent theme emanates from this evidence. The United States military is following two parallel paths, the establishment of martial law preparations and following a path of extreme combat readiness. What is not quite as clear with regard to combat readiness, is the readiness about civil war preparations, a coming world war, or both? Before I present today’s information related to these topics, I would first like to digress in the following section of this paper in order to demonstrate, in a general fashion, how I form conclusions and what motivates me to investigate certain issues over others. Finally, the question will be answered as whether we are more in war mode or martial law mode with regard to Jade Helm.

No Shortage of Tips

People…

View original post 1,313 more words

Every Police Stop is a Death Threat

Flyover-Press.com

Every police stop is “Stop or I’ll Shoot” even if governments would like us to believe otherwise. This is the nature of the State itself, and to say otherwise is to lie…So if you endorse the State as an institution, then you endorse the killing of Samuel Dubose…You cannot have it both ways…You cannot blame it on race…You cannot blame it on guns…This is your fault, and you deserve to share a cell with Ray Tensing.

The Essence of Liberty: Volume I: Liberty and History: The Rise and Fall of the Noble Experiment with Constitutionally Limited Government (Liberty and ... Limited Government) (Volume 1) The Essence of Liberty: Volume II: The Economics of Liberty (Volume 2) The Essence of Liberty: Volume III: A Universal Philosophy of Political Economy (Liberty: A Universal Political Ethic) (Volume 3)Start at the beginning and follow the logic. — jtl, 419

by Christopher Cantwell

Environmental & Natural Resource Economics: The Austrian View ere appears to be some confusion in the world about the nature of police work. Almost nobody doubts the necessity of police officers roaming the cities in which they “work,” seeking out anyone who would dare defy the edicts of their political masters. Very few would say, that roads Combat Shooter's HandbookReconnaissance Marine MCI 03.32f: Marine Corps InstituteThe Betrayed: On Warriors, Cowboys and Other MisfitsThis should be privatized and controlled as the property owner…

View original post 1,306 more words

My YouTube Channel for Police Brutality, Racism

Truth- A Right to Fight For...

I have been away from this blog site for far too long; but that doesn’t mean I haven’t been active. I just couldn’t handle at that time all I was doing and maintaining another blog. However, I am back now and plan to be posting a few times a week, and also making videos.
In fact, I’ll let the videos explain 🙂
The first video is just a little information about me and etc; it’s short… And then I’m going to include one video from an argument I had a few weeks ago that sparked me wanting to get back into blogging about police brutality and racism as it sums up my views on racism an police brutality pretty well.
I just made my new channel tonight, click here to subscribe for police brutality, racism, and etc related videos. There is only one video right now as I started this…

View original post 122 more words

Nevada Division of Forestry warns drone users to keep their aircraft grounded during Nevada wildfires

drones fireThe Nevada Division of Forestry encourages owners of unmanned aircraft systems, also known as drones, to keep them on the ground during a fire and let firefighters and aircraft work to stop fires as quickly and safely as possible.

Due to recent incidents in which drones have interfered with manned aircraft involved in wildland firefighting operations, NDF wants drone owners to understand that flying drones interferes with the protection of lives, property and Nevada’s natural resources.

“If they fly, we can’t,” says Nevada Firewarden, Bob Roper. “It’s a major risk to pilots, ground personnel and aircraft. There may also be civil and/or criminal consequences that Nevada operators need to know about.”

Often a temporary flight restriction is put in place around wildfires to protect firefighting aircraft. No one other than the agencies involved in the firefighting effort can fly any manned or unmanned aircraft in such a TFR. Anyone who violates a TFR and endangers the safety of manned aircraft could be subject to penalties. Even if there is no TFR, operating a UAS could still pose a hazard to firefighting aircraft and would violate Federal Aviation Regulations.

“If you endanger manned aircraft or people on the ground with an unmanned aircraft, you could be liable for a fine ranging from $1,000 to a maximum of $25,000,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta. “Know the rules before you fly. If you don’t, serious penalties could be coming your way for jeopardizing these important missions.” Go here for more

Is Nevada ALEC’s Favorite State?

Diane Ravitch's blog

Here are the legislative changes recently enacted in Nevada, designed to implement charters, vouchers, test-based teacher evaluations, merit pay, and almost every other idea in the ALEC bucket list of how-to-create-chaos-in-public-schools-and-encourage-privatization.

This post was written by “Nevada Succeeds,” a corporate reform group.
Friends,

Below my email signature is our weekly Implementation Update; we hope this serves as a useful tool for the community as we continue to monitor the progress made on implementation and regulation of key policies that have come out of the 2015 Legislative Session. Every week, we will adjust the list to put the bills that have undergone recent changes at the top.

In this issue, we have categorized each bill into a one of five main areas of focus which will provide more clarity as to how each piece of legislation relates to the broader agenda.. Below you will see a key highlighting the color that…

View original post 2,462 more words

7th Amendment protest coming to Reno next week to demand the use of summary judgment as unconstitutional?

Miranda Du

 Is Ty Robben’s 7th Amendment protest against Judge Miranda Du coming to Reno next week?

Judge Miranda Du Reno nevada

7th Amendment protest coming to Reno Judge Miranda Du next week to demand the use of summary judgment as unconstitutional?

Judge Miranda Du

7th Amendment protest coming to Reno Judge Miranda Du next week to demand the use of summary judgment as unconstitutional?


Is a 7th Amendment protest coming to Reno next week? Stay tuned. Summary Judgement is unconstitutional. Ty Robben plans to demonstrate in the very near future about the Reno Federal Court and in particular, Judge Miranda Du’s use of summary judgement to dismiss certain causes of action in his civil rights lawsuit against various Carson City officials including former disgraced DA Neil Rombardo and his corrupt assistant DA Mark Krueger.

Ty Robben started a go fund me website to help raise money for the protest and his dog Tytan who has medical needs because of a recent discovery of bone cancer in his leg.

Ty Robben’s lawsuit also includes corrupt Carson City justice of the peace “judge” John Tatro. judge tatro

The complaint also includes the Carson City Department  of Alternative Sentencing (DAS) and names numerous Defendants including Sheriff Kenny Furlong and even jailhouse Dr. Joe Joseph E. McEllistrem.

Those listed are Defendants’ in a civil rights lawsuit file by Robben that includes a cornucopia of claims including malicious prosecution, defamation, RICO (racketeering), false imprisonment, false arrest, and virtually every Constitutional amendment a person can suffer from including the 1st 2nd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th and 14th amendments of the US Constitution!

Ty Robben is fed-up and demands justice or there will be no peace. Stay tuned as the next Bundy Ranch heats up in crazy Nevada.

Ty Robben says he want’s peace and justice. No justice is no peace. This is a crazy case where Judge Tatro falsify accused Robben of hiring a hit man to kill him and well as trying to frame Robben on the shooting of Tatro’s home which turned out to be the crazy drunk judges mistress! Only in Carson City can you find hillbilly justice like this.

Miranda Du judge, 7th amendment, protest,

Ty Robben says “This is hurting me financially and preventing me from getting treatment for my dog Tytan who’s suffering from bone cancer.”

Ty Robben says “This is hurting me financially and preventing me from getting treatment for my dog Tytan who’s suffering from bone cancer.”

Stay tuned as this story develops.

Why Summary Judgment is Unconstitutional

Suja A. Thomas

Abstract:

Summary judgment is cited as a significant reason for the dramatic decline in the number of jury trials in civil cases in federal court. Judges extensively use the device to clear the federal docket of cases deemed meritless. Recent scholarship even has called for the mandatory use of summary judgment prior to settlement. While other scholars question the use of summary judgment in certain types of cases (for example, civil rights cases), all scholars and judges assume away a critical question: whether summary judgment is constitutional. The conventional wisdom is that the Supreme Court settled the issue a century ago in Fidelity & Deposit Co. v. United States. But a review of that case reveals that the conventional wisdom is wrong: the constitutionality of summary judgment has never been resolved by the Supreme Court. This Essay is the first to examine the question and takes the seemingly heretical position that summary judgment is unconstitutional. The question is governed by the Seventh Amendment which provides that “[i]n Suits at common law, . . . the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.” The Supreme Court has held that “common law” in the Seventh Amendment refers to the English common law in 1791. This Essay demonstrates that no procedure similar to summary judgment existed under the English common law and also reveals that summary judgment violates the core principles or “substance” of the English common law. The Essay concludes that, despite the uniform acceptance of the device, summary judgment is unconstitutional. The Essay then responds to likely objections, including that the federal courts cannot function properly without summary judgment. By describing the burden that the procedure of summary judgment imposes upon the courts, the Essay argues that summary judgment may not be necessary to the judicial system but rather, by contrast, imposes significant costs upon the system.

read more: Why summary judgment is unconstitutional

Judge Du

judge miranda du,

Battlefield America: The War on the American People

police-brutality-pepper-spray-poster1Battlefield America: The War on the American People, the follow-up to his award-winning book A Government of Wolves: The Emerging American Police State, constitutional attorney John W. Whitehead paints a terrifying portrait of a nation at war with itself and which is on the verge of undermining the basic freedoms guaranteed to the citizenry in the Constitution. Indeed, police have been transformed into extensions of the military, towns and cities have become battlefields, and the American people have been turned into enemy combatants, to be spied on, tracked, scanned, frisked, searched, subjected to all manner of intrusions, intimidated, invaded, raided, manhandled, censored, silenced, shot at, locked up, and denied due process.

Read More: http://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1590793099/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=15121&creative=330641&creativeASIN=1590793099&linkCode=as2&tag=henrithibodea-20

NIBIRU: THE FAKE 2nd COMING OF CHRIST

PLEASE|PRESS|RESET

Humor me and read this so you can file it away in your brain in the coming months:

Everyone is waking up to the historical significance of the Blood Moon Tetrad that is coming to an end this Fall, on September 28th, 2015.  If you didn’t know what a Blood Moon Tetrad was, chances are you’ve at least seen all the articles online regarding a very rare astronomical anomaly that has historical significance in the Jewish faith.


blood moon chart


To jazz up all of that significance, we also have the travel plans of the good ‘ol Pope, who plans to be representing the Catholic Church in America for 3 days in late September. On the docket is a meeting at the White House, several masses to conduct, and a visit to Philadelphia.

pope visit THE ‘TIMING’ OF THE POPE’S VISIT IS VERY CURIOUS. IF THEY WANTED TO ANNOUNCE SOMETHING          …

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Rand: Trump’s Surge Is Fueled By Media And “Temporary, Sort Of, Loss Of Sanity”

GUNNY G ~ BLOGGIN' BAD! ~ WHAT BECAME OF THAT "NO MORE PC" THING?????? ~ WHEN WILL THE OBAMA SYNDICATE BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE, IF EVER? ~ AINO: AMERICANS IN NAME ONLY!

Rand: Trump’s Surge Is Fueled By Media And “Temporary, Sort Of, Loss Of Sanity”

Breitbart.com ^ | July 30, 2015 | Ian Hanchett

Posted on 7/30/2015, 8:58:33 PM by Biggirl

Kentucky Senator and Republican presidential candidate Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) argued that the rise of fellow candidate Donald Trump is due to extensive media coverage of Trump and “a temporary, sort of, lost of sanity” on Thursday’s broadcast of CNN’s “Wolf.” Rand said of Trump’s rise in the polls, “Television works, Wolf. If you would give some other candidates time from 8:00 in the morning until 8:00 at night, all day long, every day for three weeks, I’m guessing some other candidates might rise as well. So, for example, while some people are hearing about one candidate all the time, very few people know that I’ve offered a tax code that you can fill out your tax return on one…

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“Self-Avowed Expert On ‘The Negro'”: Rand Paul Meets With Rogue Rancher Cliven Bundy

mykeystrokes.com

Rand Paul met privately with Cliven Bundy on Monday, the Nevada rancher and anti-government activist told POLITICO.

The encounter came after Bundy attended an event for the Kentucky senator’s presidential campaign at the Eureka Casino in Mesquite, Nevada. When the larger group dispersed, Bundy said, he was escorted by Paul’s aides to a back room where he and the Republican 2016 contender spoke for approximately 45 minutes. (“There were no scheduled meetings at Senator Paul’s stop in Mesquite. He spoke to many people who came to this public event, none for 45 minutes and none planned,” Paul spokesman Sergio Gor said.)

The Nevada rancher said that he had expected only to have an opportunity to shake hands with Paul and make small-talk. He was surprised when campaign aides found a private room and allowed Bundy, his wife and son to speak with the candidate for the better part of an…

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Paul and Bundy: Tax Evasion, Sedition Or Tales Of The Negro?

The Pardu's Scroll


Re Post from Addicting Info


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Before the AddictingInfo piece with quotes from Cliven Bundy regarding his visit with Rand Paul, we will restate a couple of non-negotiable points about Paul.

Rand Paul is a Chameleon…and he knows it.
He speaks to his audience without regard for
veracity and honesty, thus he changes his colors to suit the moment.
Next, Paul is an admitted liar and manipulator who did not hesitate in 2013 to speak of mis-information as a use utility.

Paul’s visit to Nevada earlier in the week was marked with a well noted 45 minute meeting with the nation’s number one tax evader.  Well, let’s say number one evader who doesn’t employ high priced overseas tax shelters.  Paul’s visit with the man who will not hesitate to “tell you about the Negro,” was perplexing until…

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Urban Police Forces in America need a renewal

randomthoughts

Not a day goes by without another story about a white cop treating an African-American with total disrespect. Frequently resulting in a brutal beating of the citizen and occasionally resulting in death.
These officers leave their lily white suburban homes every day and enter the cities to police the “savages” within. This has to stop and it has to stop now.
We are not talking about the occasional “bad apple”, we are talking about all the apples. The good apples have either been spoiled already or have been indoctrinated to stay true to the blue in all matters.
A communities’ police force must represent the community. The people must be allowed to police themselves.
Current officers should be reassigned to sit in lawn chairs with assault rifles guarding recruitment sites or perhaps movie theaters. Any that have enough time should be OFFERED an early retirement.
Hire and train new officers…

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NV-Sen: Sen. Gary Peters (D. MI) helps Catherine Cortez Masto (D) Get Ready To Take On Joe Heck (R)

Received this e-mail today from U.S. Senator Gary Peters (D. MI) in support of former Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto’s (D. NV) U.S. Senate campaign:

Nevada is the race to watch in 2016: Not only is it Republicans’ best chance of stealing a seat, it’s one of just a few toss-ups that will decide ​control of ​the Senate.

Catherine Cortez Masto is running to keep Nevada blue and take back the Senate​. Right now, she needs our support.The polls are showing a virtual tie, the other side is already running hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of ads, and Catherine’s Tea Party opponent could spend up to $10 million – ON TOP of all the ​super PAC money pouring into the state.

We need to raise $10,000 for Catherine by midnight tonight to have the resources to fight back ​now – and if we wait, it will already be too late. Will you give now to help Catherine keep Nevada blue and take back the Senate?

https://secure.actblue.com/…

Catherine is a historic candidate with an incredible record. As Nevada’s attorney general, she has stood up for our progressive values.​ ​If elected, she would be the first Latina to serve in the Senate​.​

But our opponents are determined to ​take​ this seat and keep their grip on the Senate. And they’​re pulling out all the stops to do it: misleading ads, buckets of dark money spending – the whole nine yards.

Catherine has to be ready to fight back no matter what they throw at her next – and to do that she​’s counting on us to raise $10,000 by midnight tonight.

With Harry Reid retiring, it’s critical that we hold on to his seat. Give whatever you can now to help Catherine Cortez Masto keep Nevada blue and take back the Senate.

https://secure.actblue.com/…

New Senate Majority PAC Poll: Leads Joe Heck Catherine Cortez Masto

Nevada Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto

Nevada Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto

Pollster Tom Jensen’s analysis notes that Cortez Masto’s numbers have more room to grow, as voters who are currently undecided in the Senate race also supported President Obama by 24 points in 2012 and support Hillary Clinton over Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio, and Scott Walker by an average of 11 points. These voters are likely Democratic voters in the Senate race next year.    Jensen also argues that Clinton’s coattails in Nevada will benefit Cortez Masto significantly in 2016 and should Clinton’s margins hold, “she’s likely to bring Cortez Masto along with her.”

The full polling memo can be read here.